Cover Story

Forged By Fire

Peter Eastwood and three trusted colleagues set out to build Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance.
By: | December 1, 2013 • 9 min read

To understand the professional bonds and temperaments of the team that leads Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance, go back to 2008.

Peter Eastwood, president of BHSI since its April 29 launch, then worked at Lexington Insurance, AIG’s excess and surplus division. David Bresnahan, David Fields and Sanjay Godhwani, the three other players in the leadership quartet that left AIG for BHSI in April, were also AIG employees at the time. All of them had worked together on major projects and trusted one another. Then came September of 2008 and the earth shook in financial services.

We all know the story. AIG’s liquidity problems brought it to its knees. For many of its employees, the question became, should I stay or should I go?

These four stayed.

David Bresnahan, now an executive vice president, casualty, healthcare professional liability, executive and professional lines with BHSI, recalled that AIG’s property/casualty operation was financially sound at the time but was losing talent.

“Because of the parent company challenges and the possibility that people would start leaving the organization, there was the threat of a vicious spiral where people would leave and then customers would leave and lose confidence in the property/casualty businesses’ ability to move forward. And if the customers had left, that is the beginning of that downward spiral,” Bresnahan said.

David Bresnahan, executive vice president, casualty, healthcare professional liability, executive and professional lines, Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance

“Those years that we spent together — between December of 2008 through 2011 — were when I learned some of the most important life lessons with respect to leadership and teamwork.”
— David Bresnahan, executive vice president, casualty, healthcare, professional liability, executive & professional lines, Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance

Kevin Kelley, who had stood at the helm of Lexington for years, left the company in December of 2008 to take his present job as CEO of Ironshore.

Eastwood was then promoted to president and CEO of Lexington. It was, to that point in his career, the chance of a lifetime.

“It was an enormous opportunity for me and I recognized it for what it was. As a result of that event I have received more opportunity than I ever would have been given,” Eastwood said.

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But he and his colleagues who stayed at Lexington and AIG had to battle to save the company and its reputation. Looking back, Eastwood now sees that as his proudest moment at AIG.

“I think the thing that stands out the most is how my former colleagues and I came together at the height of the financial crisis to move together as a team to move the organization forward. Essentially to run to the fight, to stay with the organization,” Eastwood said.

“I stayed, and I think my colleagues stayed, out of a sense of loyalty to one another and to the organization, as well as based on a commitment we felt we had made to customers and other business partners. Many of us had worked for AIG for many, many years,” he said.

One can’t gauge an individual in just one meeting. But when Risk & Insurance® interviewed Eastwood in New York in early November, he came off as someone with a great deal of self-control, who chooses his words very carefully. One executive who watched Eastwood at work in the stressful days of late 2008 recalled him as one who kept his cool.

“Despite everything going on around him,” said James Drinkwater, president of the brokerage division for the AmWINS Group Inc., “he was always very calm and very thoughtful in his approach.

“He obviously took over at a very difficult time in Lexington’s history. He retained many of the key staff and I think he just demonstrated great leadership at that time,” he said.

Eastwood also marks late 2008 and beyond as a time that strengthened his bonds with Bresnahan, Fields and Godhwani.

The Team

As he looks at the team he is assembling now, that proven success in sticking together to help salvage AIG is in his hip pocket.

“I have said repeatedly to people that they are individuals who are just great professionals and equally good, if not better, human beings,” Eastwood said.

In Eastwood, Bresnahan and Fields said, they have a leader who leads by example, someone who holds himself to high standards and expects the same from teammates.

“He is one of the hardest working individuals you will meet. No matter how high he has climbed in particular organizations, I find that he really sweats the details and really gets into the weeds of the business,” said Bresnahan.

Bresnahan said that he too feels the time the four spent at AIG when it was reeling not only strengthened their bonds with one another but helped them grow as individuals.

R12-13p24-26_01Eastwood12-2.indd

David Fields, executive vice president, underwriting, actuarial, finance and reinsurance at Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance

“I agree with Peter,” Bresnahan said, “Those years that we spent together — between December of 2008 through 2011 — were when I learned some of the most important life lessons with respect to leadership and teamwork.

“And I share Peter’s view that it was one of the more rewarding times. It really revolved around teamwork, collaboration and being highly communicative to employees, customers and brokers. Those were some of the keys that got us through that very difficult time,” he said.

That experience and the way it strengthened existing bonds, instead of weakening them, is perhaps why this team at BHSI has as much faith as it does.

“It comes from having worked together in a variety of different situations and feeling that we had each other’s backs. We really feel comfortable with each other,” said Fields, now executive vice president, underwriting, actuarial, finance and reinsurance at BHSI.

Chance of a Lifetime

Being able to launch BHSI, backed as it is by the Berkshire Hathaway name and balance sheet, presents unique advantages.

“From my perspective, I smile every morning. I feel like I need to be able to pinch myself about is this all real,” said Fields.

“We are fortunate to be able to have the capital support and name recognition of the Berkshire organization; the freedom within the organization to focus on the things that are important and to be able to accomplish them quickly; and then the ability to work with people that we know and feel comfortable with.

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“We are creating an environment here that is completely different, in my opinion, than other places in the industry … it is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” he said.

Bresnahan said the response from customers so far has been glowing.

“When you meet with customers,
a lot of validation comes out of those meetings. There is genuine joy that people have seeing what we are doing and recognizing that we have a really special opportunity,” Bresnahan said.

“They have approached the marketplace in a very responsible fashion,” said AmWINS’ Drinkwater, “and I think that they have got a terrific team that is going to be incredibly successful in building a new company.”

On the one hand, BHSI has capital strength and a strong brand so it is not viewed as a new entrant, but on the other, it has the unique opportunity to build a team and systems from the ground up that are highly efficient and service-oriented.

R12-13p24-26_01Eastwood12-2.indd“The opportunity in and of itself is exciting. But the ability to build a company with people you respect, trust and have a very strong working relationship with is unique.”
— Sanjay Godhwani, executive vice president, property and programs, Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance

“The opportunity in and of itself is exciting,” said Sanjay Godhwani, executive vice president, property and programs for BHSI. “But the ability to build a company with people you respect, trust and have a very strong working relationship with is unique.”

Since its launch, Eastwood said, BHSI has grown quickly and has been received enthusiastically by brokers and insureds. The possibilities are obviously enormous, but for Eastwood — who left a position as CEO and president of AIG property/casualty in the Americas for this unique opening — so too is the gravity with which it must be treated.

“It comes with a lot of opportunity and a lot of responsibility. The former of which I am thankful for, the latter of which I take very seriously. While the opportunity is significant for me, it is important for me to recognize the team and their contributions and the significance of this opportunity to them as well,” Eastwood said.

The Business So Far

BHSI was launched in April with Eastwood, Bresnahan, Fields and Godhwani. As of early November, the company had 73 employees and five business units, those being a property group, a casualty group, an executive professional lines group, a health care professional liability group and a program business group.

Coming out of the gate, Eastwood described BHSI as “disproportionately focused on the E&S market right now” for a number of reasons, “but evolving quickly.”

The reasons for the initial focus on E&S is that there is a good growth trajectory in E&S. It offers freedom of rate and form, and that makes it attractive for a firm looking to stand up businesses quickly, Eastwood said.

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Getting to work in admitted markets takes a little longer to set up, but Eastwood said BHSI is in the process of doing that. The directors’ and officers’ market, in particular, and the larger professional lines space is more of an admitted market.

“We have just completed a primary D&O policy form and we are now underway getting that policy form filed and the rates filed with it,” Eastwood said.

BHSI is, at this point, also a predominantly U.S.-focused business. The United States is by far the largest market in the world and it is where the Berkshire Hathaway infrastructure is “largely focused and built,” Eastwood said.

But BHSI does have an interest, he said, in moving the business outside of the United States and is exploring opportunities. That said, the company is writing U.S.-domiciled risk with foreign exposures.

In terms of distribution, Eastwood said his team is “interested in seeing as much of the marketplace as we can and as a result we are interested in seeing as much business from as many brokers as we can see it, because it is, again, the only way to see the totality of the market.”

Eastwood said the network will be both retail and wholesale-focused.

“I value the wholesale broker channel as a very effective distribution channel for us, reaching brokers that we couldn’t get to on our own or getting to geographic territories that we wouldn’t get to on our own,” he said.

As this venture unfolds, the excitement on the part of the BHSI executives is palpable and the possibilities before them look to be historic in their uniqueness.

Eastwood described this chance to build a business within Berkshire Hathaway as an opportunity to work within a company that has “industry leading characteristics.”

One, he said, Berkshire Hathaway is a company that knows and values the insurance industry. Its personal lines business Geico and its reinsurance arm Gen Re being just two examples.

Two, it has great financial strength.

“In a business where companies are transferring risk and we are assuming risk — it’s a competitive advantage,” Eastwood said.

The third is the brand of Berkshire Hathaway, standing as it does in Eastwood’s words, for “integrity and doing things the right way.”

And the fourth is group empowerment.

Eastwood said he has the right team to act with that freedom and deliver.

It’s fair to say that the rest of the industry is watching closely.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Report: Hospitality

Bridging the Protection Gap

When travelers stay home, hospitality companies recoup lost income through customized, data-defined policies.
By: | October 12, 2017 • 9 min read

In the wake of a hurricane, earthquake, pandemic, terror attack, or any event that causes carnage on a grand scale, affected areas usually are subject to a large “protection gap” – the difference between insured loss and total economic loss. Depending on the type of damage, the gap can be enormous, leaving companies and communities scrambling to obtain the funds needed for a quick recovery.

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RMS estimates that Hurricane Harvey’s rampage through Texas could cause as much as $90 billion in total economic damage. The modeling firm also stated that “[National Flood Insurance Program] penetration rates are as low as 20 percent in the Houston area, and thus most of the losses will be uninsured.”

In addition to uninsured losses from physical damage, many businesses in unaffected surrounding areas will suffer non-physical contingent business interruption losses. The hospitality industry is particularly susceptible to this exposure, and its losses often fall into the protection gap.

Natural catastrophes and other major events that compromise travelers’ safety have prolonged impacts on tourism and hospitality. Even if they suffer no physical damage, any hotel or resort will lose business as travelers avoid the area.

“The hospitality industry is reliant on people moving freely. If people don’t feel safe, they won’t travel. And that cuts off the lifeblood of the industry,” said Christian Ryan, U.S. Hospitality and Gaming Practice Leader, Marsh.

Christian Ryan
U.S. Hospitality and Gaming Practice Leader, Marsh

“People are going away from the devastation, not toward it,” said Evan Glassman, president and CEO, New Paradigm Underwriters.

Drops in revenue resulting from decreased occupancy and average daily room rate can sometimes be difficult to trace back to a major event when a hotel suffered no physical harm. Traditional business interruption policies require physical damage as a coverage condition. Even contingent business interruption coverages might only kick in if a hotel’s direct suppliers were taken offline by physical damage.

If everyone remains untouched and intact, though, it’s near impossible to demonstrate how much of a business downturn was caused by the hurricane three states away.

“Hospitality companies are concerned that their traditional insurance policies only cover business interruption resulting from physical damage,” said Bob Nusslein, head of Innovative Risk Solutions for the Americas, Swiss Re Corporate Solutions.

“These companies have large uninsured exposure from events which do not cause physical damage to their assets, yet result in reduced income.”

Power of Parametrics

Parametric insurance is designed specifically to bridge the protection gap and address historically uninsured or underinsured risks.

Parametric coverage is defined and triggered by the characteristics of an event, rather than characteristics of the loss. Triggers are custom-built based on an insured’s unique location and exposures, as well as their budget and risk tolerance.

“Triggers typically include a combination of the occurrence of a given event and a reduction in occupancy rates or RevPar for the specific hotel assets,” Nusslein said. Though sometimes the parameters of an event — like measures of storm intensity — are enough to trigger a payout on their own.

For hurricane coverage, for example, one policy trigger might be the designation of a Category 3-5 storm within a 100-mile radius of the location. Another trigger might be a 20 percent drop in RevPAR, or revenue per available room. If both parameters are met, a pre-determined payout amount would be administered. No investigations or claims adjustment necessary.

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The same type of coverage could apply in less severe situations where traditional insurance just doesn’t respond. Event or entertainment companies, for example, often operate at the whim of Mother Nature. While they may not be forced to cancel a production due to inclement weather, they will nevertheless take a hit to the bottom line if fewer patrons show up.

Christian Phillips, focus group leader for Beazley’s Weatherguard parametric products, said that as little as a quarter- to a half-inch of rain over a four- to five-hour period is enough to prevent people from coming to an event, or to leave early.

“That’s a persistent rainfall that will wear down people’s patience,” he said.

“A rule of thumb for parametric weather coverage, if you’re looking to protect loss of revenue when your event has not actually been cancelled, you will probably lose up to 20 to 30 percent of your revenue in bad weather. That depends on the client and the type of event, but that’s the standard we’ve realized from historical claims data.”

The industry is now drawing on data to establish these rules of thumb for more serious losses sustained by hospitality companies after major events.

“Until recently the insurance industry has not created products to address these non-physical damage business interruption exposures. The industry is now collaborating with big data companies to access data, which in turn, allows us to structure new products,” Nusslein said.

Data-Driven Triggers

Insurers source data from weather organizations that track temperature, rainfall, wind speeds and snowfall, among other perils, by the hour and sometimes by the minute. Parametric triggers are determined based on historical storm data, which indicates how likely a given location is to be hit.

“We try to get a minimum of 30 years of hourly data for those perils for a given location,” Phillips said.

“Global weather is changing, though, so we focus particularly on the last five to 10 years. From that we can build a policy that fits the exposure that we see in the data, and we use the data to price it correctly.”

New Paradigm Underwriters collects their own wind speed data via a network of anemometers that stretch from Corpus Christi, Texas, all the way to Massachusetts, and works with modeling firms like RMS to gather additional underwriting information.

The hospitality industry is reliant on people moving freely. If people don’t feel safe, they won’t travel. And that cuts off the lifeblood of the industry.– Christian Ryan, U.S. Hospitality and Gaming Practice Leader, Marsh

While severe weather is the most common event of concern, parametric cover can also apply to terrorism and pandemic risks.

“We offer a terror attack quote on every one of our event policies because everyone asks for it,” said Beazley’s Phillips.

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“We didn’t do it 10 years ago, but that’s the world we live in today.”

An attack could lead to civil unrest, fire or any number of things outside an insured’s control. It would likely disrupt travel over a wide geographic region.

“A terrorist event could cause wide area devastation and loss of attraction, which results in lost income for hospitality companies,” Nusslein said.

Disease outbreaks also dampen travel and tourism. Zika, which was most common in South America and the Caribbean, still prevented people from traveling to south Florida.

“Occupancy went down significantly in that region,” Marsh’s Ryan said.

“If there is a pandemic across the U.S., a parametric coverage would make sense. All travel within and inbound to the U.S. would go down, and parametric policies could protect hotel revenues in non-impacted areas. Official statements from the CDC such as evacuation orders or warnings could qualify as a trigger.”

Less data exists around terror attacks and pandemics than for weather, though hotels are taking steps to collect information around their exposure.

“It’s hard to quantify how an infectious disease outbreak will impact business, but we and clients are using big data to track travel patterns,” Ryan said.

Hospitality Metrics

Any data collected has to be verified, or “cleaned.”

“We only deal with entities that will clean the data so we know the historical data we’re getting is accurate,” Phillips said.

“There are mountains of data out there, but it’s unusable if it’s not clean.”

Parametric underwriters also tap into the insured’s historical data around occupancy and room rates to estimate the losses it may suffer from decreased revenue.

Bob Nusslein, head of Innovative Risk Solutions for the Americas, Swiss Re Corporate Solutions.

“The hospitality industry uses two key metrics to measure loss of business income. These include occupancy rate and revenue per available room, or RevPAR. These are the traditional measurements of business health,” Swiss Re’s Nusslein said.  RevPAR is calculated by multiplying a hotel’s average daily room rate (ADR) by its occupancy rate.

“The hotel industry has been contributing its data on occupancy, RevPAR, room supply and demand, and historical data on geographical and seasonal trends to independent data aggregators for many years. It has done an exceptional job of aggregating business data to measure performance downturns from routine economic fluctuations and from major ‘Black Swan’ events, like the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the 2008 financial crisis or the 2009 SARS epidemic.”

Claims history can also provide an understanding of how much revenue a hotel or an event company has lost in the past due to any type of business interruption. Business performance metrics combined with claims data determine an appropriate payout amount.

Like coverage triggers, payouts from parametric policies are specifically defined and pre-determined based on data and statistical evidence.

This is the key benefit of parametric coverage: triggers are hit, payment is made. With minimal or no adjustment process, claims are paid quickly, enabling insureds to begin recovery immediately.

Applying Parametric Payments

For hotels with no physical damage, but significant drops in occupancy and revenue, funds from a parametric policy can help bridge the income gap until business picks up again, covering expenses related to regular maintenance, utilities and marketing.

Because payment is not tied to a specific type or level of loss, it can be applied wherever insureds need it, so long as it doesn’t advance them to a better financial position than they enjoyed prior to the loss.

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Parametric policies can be designed to fill in where an insured has not yet met their deductible on a separate traditional policy. Or it could function as excess coverage. Or it could cover exposures excluded by other policies, or for which there is no insurance option at all. Completely bespoke, parametric coverages are a function of each client’s individual exposures, risk tolerance and budget.

“Parametric insurance enables underwriting of risks that are outside tolerance levels from a traditional standpoint,” NPU’s Glassman said.

The non-physical business interruption risks faced by the hospitality industry match that description pretty closely.

“Hotels are a good fit for parametric insurance because they have a guaranteed loss from a business income standpoint when there is a major storm coming,” Glassman said.

While only a handful of carriers currently offer a form of parametric coverage, the abundance of available data and advancement in data collection and analytical tools will likely fuel its popularity.

Companies can maximize the benefits of parametric coverages by building them as supplements to traditional business interruption or event cancellation policies. Both New Paradigm Underwriters and Beazley either work with other property insurers or create hybrid products in-house to combine the best of both worlds and assemble a comprehensive risk transfer solution. &

Katie Siegel is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]