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Five Critical Factors for Claims Success That Are Often Overlooked

These overlooked factors are significant in determining if your company can survive a loss.
By: | May 1, 2017 • 5 min read

Nothing is more important than getting claims resolved successfully. After all, at the heart of the insurance contract is the promise to cover losses.

That’s why the financial strength and claims reputation of carriers is so critical. These characteristics demonstrate a company’s ability and willingness to pay.

But when a business suffers a significant loss that severely limits its operations, there are several additional factors that will determine if the company will survive. In these circumstances, repairing the damage and getting back to work as fast as possible is critical.

Therefore, it’s vital to work with carriers who demonstrate these five traits:

  1. Responsiveness

Dean Owens, Head of Property and Special Risk Claims, U.S. and Canada

Recovery is a race against time, and the clock starts ticking as soon as a loss occurs. Even with Business Interruption coverage, competitors will not be sitting idle waiting for your business to get back to work.

This is why speed is critical.

Waiting weeks or even months to receive a claim payment can seriously hinder a business’s ability to become fully operational again.

“Whether a loss is large or small, companies need some working capital in the early stages of recovery to put the business back together,” said Dean Owens, Head of Property and Special Risk Claims, U.S. and Canada, AIG.

AIG recognizes that need with its ‘AIG Property Claims Promise,’ which assures that policyholders will receive a payment of up to 50 percent of the agreed total loss estimate within seven working days, which accounts for cleanup costs, property repairs, and extra expenses incurred during the rebuilding process.

The willingness and ability to pay quickly also shows clients that their insurer has the resources to support them for the long haul, even in the event of large losses.

In 2016, for example, a large resort complex suffered a major fire that destroyed several hundred of its units and 70-90 of its buildings. Claims handlers were on the scene within two days, while the fire was still smoldering. Seeing that it was a total loss, the AIG claims team expedited a $10 million advance within a week on what ultimately amounted to a multimillion dollar property claim. This working capital allowed the resort to kick off the rebuilding process immediately.

  1. Domain Expertise

Your business and industry are unique. There are complexities and peculiarities that require experience and expertise to understand. Working with claims handlers that have deep knowledge about your industry means they understand your top concerns, and how to minimize them.

Property damage will impact a casino differently than it impacts a real estate developer, for example.

“A claims handler with casino loss experience knows that a property claim is as much about the business interruption as it is the physical damage. A casino could suffer a very significant business interruption loss in a single day,” Owens said. “You need to understand your clients’ revenue streams, and how to best mitigate losses in the event of a property claim.”

Pairing the right claims handler with the right client is part of AIG’s credo of operational excellence.

“We always want to bring someone to the table who has specialized knowledge of client’s industry segment, and who has the right skills to handle the types of claims that clients are likely to have. It’s about matching the right skills and resources to the right customer,” Owens said.

  1. Access And Availability

Relationships matter. To respond quickly and effectively, a claims team that is familiar with the decision-makers in your business needs to be in place before the loss. No risk manager or executive should be meeting their claims person for the first time when they’ve just suffered a loss.

Whether an insurer has an in-house claims staff or contracts with external adjusters – or a combination of both – a claims representative should ideally be meeting with clients face-to-face as often as possible.

“We strive to get in front of the clients as often as we can,” Owens said. “We want to get claims handler at the table with clients, brokers and underwriters so everyone is on the same page. And we want our clients to know that their claims handler is their single point of contact if they have a loss. No back-and-forth or roundabout communication.”

AIG’s internal Property Claims Field Group, which is involved in about 40 percent of cases that tend to involve smaller claims, further streamlines the process. External adjusters remain critical for large claims, though, especially when multiple insurers are involved.

“We partner with some excellent outside firms, but wherever we can do something ourselves, we do it ourselves,” Owens said. “It puts us in front of the clients, and a stronger relationship leads to an expedited claims process.”

  1. Innovative Technology And Analytics

Claims data holds incredible value if properly utilized. Important insights can be gleaned from loss history about specific exposures, and a better understanding of exposures can be leveraged to improve the coverage and pricing of your risk portfolio.

But to achieve these benefits, the data needs to be tracked consistently, at a granular level and across your global portfolio.

Underwriters who have an integrated view of global claims data can see how much of a claim is for business interruption losses versus property damage. Maybe one or two locations out of a portfolio of 12 are sitting in a hail zone and are responsible for the bulk of large claims. This insight allows them to adjust their underwriting to better match the risk profile of that particular client.

“It’s about making sure you understand what you’re insuring,” Owens said. “Having this data enables the underwriter, the client and the broker to make more informed decisions.”

AIG’s IntelliRisk® system allows clients to directly access that data through an online portal. Along with detailed claims data, it provides tools to run ad hoc loss runs in real time and monitor open claim activity.

  1. Investment Training

Across the insurance industry, talent development and continuity is a pressing challenge that many acknowledge, but few have taken initiative to solve.

AIG continually feeds its talent pipeline by hiring a few interns every year and investing in their development. All of AIG’s handlers go through regular training to keep their knowledge fresh. That could include a course on hail damage or the roof rebuilding process, or some other technical aspect of property risk.

“It keeps their expertise on the leading edge of a skill set,” Owens said.

Staying sharp and continually building talent is also key to maintaining clients’ trust and confidence.

“You’re only as good as your last claim,” Owens said. “We aim to make each claim an excellent experience for our insureds every time.”

To learn more, visit: http://www.aig.com/globalproperty.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with AIG. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




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AIG is a leading international insurance organization serving customers in more than 100 countries.

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The Profession

For This Pharmaceutical Risk Director, Managing Risk Means Being Part of the Mission to Save Lives

Meet Eric Dobkin, director, insurance and risk management, for Merck & Co. Inc.
By: | September 28, 2018 • 5 min read

R&I: What was your first job?
My first job out of undergrad was as an actuarial trainee at Chubb.I was a math major in school, and I think the options for a math major coming out are either a teacher or an actuary, right? Anyway, I was really happy when the opportunity at Chubb presented itself. Fantastic company. I learned a lot there.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?
After I went back to get my MBA, I decided I wanted to work in corporate finance. When I was interviewing, one of the opportunities was with Merck. I really liked their mission, and things worked out. Given my background, they thought a good starting job would be in Merck’s risk management group. I started there, rotated through other areas within Merck finance but ultimately came back to the Insurance & Risk Management group. I guess I’m just one of those people who enjoy this type of work.

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R&I: What is risk management doing right?
I think the community is doing a good job of promoting education, sharing ideas and advancing knowledge. Opportunities like this help make us all better business partners. We can take these ideas and translate them into actionable solutions to help our companies.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?
I think we have made good advancements in articulating the value proposition of investing in risk management, but much more can be done. Sometimes there is such a focus on delivering immediate value, such as cost savings, that risk management does not get appropriate attention (until something happens). We need to develop better tools that can reinforce that risk management is value-creating and good for operational efficiency, customers and shareholders.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?
I’d actually say there hasn’t been as much change as I would have hoped. I think the industry speaks about innovation more often than it does it. To be fair, at Merck we do have key partners that are innovators, but some in the industry are less enthusiastic to consider new approaches. I think there is a real need to find new and relevant solutions for large, complex risks.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?
Cyber risk. While it’s not emerging anymore, it’s evolving, dynamic and deserves the attention it gets. Merck was an early adopter of risk transfer solutions for cyber risk, and we continue to see insurance as an important component of the overall cyber risk management framework. From my perspective, this risk, more than any other, demands continuous forward-thinking to ensure we evolve solutions.

R&I: What’s the biggest challenge you’ve faced in your career?
Sticking with the cyber theme, I’d say navigating through a cyber incident is right up there. In June 2017, Merck experienced a network cyber attack that led to a disruption of its worldwide operations, including manufacturing, research and sales. It was a very challenging environment. And managing the insurance claim that resulted has been extremely complex. But at the same time, I have learned a tremendous amount in terms of how to think about the risk, enterprise resiliency and how to manage through a cyber incident.

R&I: What advice might you give to students or other aspiring risk managers?
Have strong intellectual curiosity. Always be willing to listen and learn. Ask “why?” We deal with a lot of ambiguity in our business, and the more you seek to understand, the better you will be able to apply those learnings toward developing solutions that meet the evolving risk landscape and needs of the business.

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R&I: What role does technology play in your company’s approach to risk management?
We’re continuing to look for ways to apply technology. For example, being able to extract and leverage data that resides in our systems to evaluate risk, drive efficiencies and make things like property-value reporting easier. We’re also looking to utilize data visualization tools to help gain insights into our risks.

R&I: What are your goals for the next five to 10 years of your career?
I think, at this time, I would like to continue to learn and grow in the type of work I do and broaden my scope of responsibilities. There are many opportunities to deliver value. I want to continue to focus on becoming a stronger business partner and help enable growth.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?
I’d say right now Star Wars is top on my list. It has been magical re-watching and re-living the series I watched as a kid through the eyes of my children.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in? When I was about 15, I went to a New York Rangers versus Philadelphia Flyers game at the Philadelphia Spectrum. I wore my Rangers jersey. I would not do that again.

Eric Dobkin, director, insurance & risk management, Merck & Co. Inc

R&I: What is it about this work you find most fulfilling or rewarding?
I am passionate about Merck’s mission of saving and improving lives. “Inventing for Life” is Merck’s tagline. It’s funny, but most people don’t associate “inventing” with medicine. But Merck has been inventing medicines and vaccines for many of the world’s most challenging diseases for a long time. It’s amazing to think the products we make can help people fight terrible diseases like cancer. Whatever little bit I can do to help advance that mission is very fulfilling and rewarding.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?
Ha! My kids think I make medicine. I guess they think that because I work for Merck. I suppose if even in a small way I can contribute to Merck’s mission of saving and improving lives, I am good with that. &




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]