Risk Insider: Joe Tocco

Expanded Canal Creates Greater Opportunities … and Risks

By: | July 6, 2016 • 2 min read
Currently Chief Executive of the Americas for XL Catlin’s insurance operation, Joe Tocco has enjoyed three decades in the insurance industry at various organizations. He is also a veteran of the U.S. Navy, where he served as a nuclear field service engineer. He can be reached at [email protected]

An international consortium of companies built a new third lane and set of locks at the Panama Canal that doubles its capacity.

Like other massive infrastructure projects, the expansion effort faced an assortment of challenges. Nonetheless, on June 26, the Chinese container ship Costco Shipping Panama became the first vessel to pass through the new third lane; its name was changed to respect the honor of being the first “New Panamax”-sized ship to transit the canal.

Building Bridges

Doubling the capacity of the Panama Canal should increase trade flows between Asia and the Americas, as well as between Latin America and North America.

For example, about 10 percent of the Asia-to-U.S. container traffic could shift from the West Coast to the East Coast by 2020. A larger Panama Canal also offers an attractive alternative for shipping bulk commodities from the U.S. heartland to Asia via the Mississippi River.

For starters, bigger ships mean more accumulation risk. It’s estimated that the additional cargo moving through the canal each day will be worth about $1.25 billion. And that figure doesn’t include the vessels queuing at both ends of the canal.

And as natural gas production has surged in the U.S., producers are looking to develop new markets in Asia; an expanded Panama Canal could help facilitate that.

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For Latin America, the canal’s greater capacity could lead to increased deliveries of agricultural and other products to Asia. Similarly, we could soon see more shipments of perishable products like meat and fish, fresh produce and cut flowers from Latin America to North America.

A More Complex Risk Landscape

Doubling the canal’s capacity will also alter the risk landscape in Panama and elsewhere.

For starters, bigger ships mean more accumulation risk. It’s estimated that the additional cargo moving through the canal each day will be worth about $1.25 billion. And that figure doesn’t include the vessels queuing at both ends of the canal.

Operational risks at the canal are also potentially greater. In the original locks, electric locomotives on the lock walls pull the vessel along. In the new third lane, tugs positioned fore and aft will escort ships through the locks.

While canal pilots and tugboat captains have undergone extensive training, concerns have been expressed about the possibility of a tug losing control of the tow, resulting in damage to the lock as well as the ship. The maneuverability of the tugs selected for this task has also been questioned.

Given the Panama Canal’s prominent role in today’s supply chains, the impacts of an incident that takes the third lane offline would ripple quickly through the global economy, especially if the shutdown is protracted. Latin American companies shipping perishable products to North America, for example, could be especially affected by such an event.

Ports that have expanded, or are being expanded, to handle New Panamax (and larger) vessels also face greater accumulation and operational risks. And for ports on the East Coast of the U.S., the risks are amplified by the ongoing threat posed by hurricanes.

While it is too soon to determine how this expansion effort will reverberate throughout the Americas and across the globe, the canal should nonetheless continue to play a significant part in the ongoing march to a smaller world and a larger global economy.

Risk Management

The Profession

After 20 years in the business, Navy Pier’s Director of Risk Management values her relationships in the industry more than ever.
By: | June 1, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

Working at Dominick’s Finer Foods bagging groceries. Shortly after I was hired, I was promoted to [cashier] and then to a management position. It taught me great responsibility and it helped me develop the leadership skills I still carry today.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

While working for Hyatt Regency McCormick Place Hotel, one of my responsibilities was to oversee the administration of claims. This led to a business relationship with the director of risk management of the organization who actually owned the property. Ultimately, a position became available in her department and the rest is history.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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The risk management community is doing a phenomenal job in professional development and creating great opportunities for risk managers to network. The development of relationships in this industry is vitally important and by providing opportunities for risk managers to come together and speak about their experiences and challenges is what enables many of us to be able to do our jobs even more effectively.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Attracting, educating and retaining young talent. There is this preconceived notion that the insurance industry and risk management are boring and there could be nothing further from the truth.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

In my 20 years in the industry, the biggest change in risk management and the insurance industry are the various types of risk we look to insure against. Many risks that exist today were not even on our radar 20 years ago.

Gina Kirchner, director of risk management, Navy Pier Inc.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

FM Global. They have been our property carrier for a great number of years and in my opinion are the best in the business.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the US economy or pessimistic and why?

I am optimistic that policies will be put in place with the new administration that will be good for the economy and business.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

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The commercial risks that are of most concern to me are cyber risks, business interruption, and any form of a health epidemic on a global scale. We are dealing with new exposures and new risks that we are truly not ready for.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

My mother has played a significant role in shaping my ideals and values. She truly instilled a very strong work ethic in me. However, there are many men and women in business who have mentored me and have had a significant impact on me and my career as well.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I am most proud of making the decision a couple of years ago to return to school and obtain my [MBA]. It took a lot of prayer, dedication and determination to accomplish this while still working a full time job, being involved in my church, studying abroad and maintaining a household.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

“Heaven Is For Real” by Todd Burpo and Lynn Vincent. I loved the book and the movie.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

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A French restaurant in Paris, France named Les Noces de Jeannette Restaurant à Paris. It was the most amazing food and brings back such great memories.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Israel. My husband and I just returned a few days ago and spent time in Jerusalem, Nazareth, Jericho and Jordan. It was an absolutely amazing experience. We did everything from riding camels to taking boat rides on the Sea of Galilee to attending concerts sitting on the Temple steps. The trip was absolutely life changing.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Many, many years ago … I went parasailing in the Caribbean. I had a great experience and didn’t think about the risk at the time because I was young, single and free. Looking back, I don’t know that I would make the same decision today.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I would have to say the relationships and partnerships I have developed with insurance carriers, brokers and other professionals in the industry. To have wonderful working relationships with such a vast array of talented individuals who are so knowledgeable and to have some of those relationships develop into true friendships is very rewarding.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

My friends and family have a general idea that my position involves claims and insurance. However, I don’t think they fully understand the magnitude of my responsibilities and the direct impact it has on my organization, which experiences more than 9 million visitors a year.




Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]