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Fine Arts

Eight Questions for 2017 Power Broker Mary Pontillo

2017 Power Broker Mary Pontillo talks to R&I about her love of the Fine Arts business.
By: | February 22, 2017 • 8 min read

Intrigued by the unique world of risk she handles, Risk & Insurance® asked (Risk Strategies Company subsidiary) DeWitt Stern Vice President and 2017 Power Broker® winner Mary Pontillo to tell us more about her love for fine art and why helping to cover risk in the art world means so much to her.

R&I:  Mary we know you’ve got a background in art history. It must be very fulfilling then for you to work in the business of insuring art. Tell us more about your connection with art and artists and what it means to you.

MP: The only way I would be happy in the insurance industry is by doing what I’m doing; insuring artwork. It’s often the case that people in the art world don’t come from a business background. I feel I can help art-oriented people understand something both very esoteric and important. I speak their language and essentially become a translator of insurance jargon into something an art-oriented person can understand.

For instance, when I sat down for the first time with a well-known artist to discuss what he wanted out of an insurance payment, it was deeply gratifying.  He had never really thought about how he’d use his insurance or what he expected from a claim. Being able to counsel one of the most famous living artists on something like this was quite special for me.

R&I: Who are some of your favorite artists, past and present?

MP: I dedicated a great deal of time to studying early 20th Century American art so I love artists like Marsden Hartley and Guy Pene du Bois.

Janine Antoni’s work always makes me think. Her “Lick and Lather” work consisting of self-portrait busts – half made of chocolate and half made of soap, the soap lathered and chocolate licked — always makes me think in a circular way. What if she licked the soap? I love artwork that gives me a visceral response like hers.

Gerard Richter’s technical abilities stop me in my tracks.

I own a Ghada Amer screen print and dream of the day I will own one of her prints with vellum and embroidery.

R&I: Tell us about a devastating art loss and how you helped the insured to recover.

MP: Nothing compares to the days, weeks and months after Superstorm Sandy. Beginning at midnight, when Sandy hit NYC, claims reports poured in. The first was from a museum client via text as I was trying to get a few hours of sleep during the intense storm. A colleague and I both lived in Queens and the few days following Sandy we were the only people on our team with electricity. We were able to log on and set everyone’s out of office messages to forward to our cell phones and email addresses.

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Clients that I’ve known for years — some of the most stoic people — were facing the worst situations their businesses had ever seen. I’ll never forget one of the most well respected dealers in the industry calling me and saying: “I am not exaggerating when I say that this is absolute devastation.”

Knowing that I was the voice of calm and direction made me feel like all of the policies I’ve sold and serviced over the years came to life. We walked clients through triage steps over the phone and connected them with claims adjusters. Those first 72 hours were some of the most intense and stressful while helping claims adjusters, my colleagues on the ground in Chelsea and Brooklyn, and my clients through the recovery process.

I would speak to a frantic client on day one after Sandy, try to calm them down and tell them when to expect the claims adjuster. I’d then speak to them on day two after they met with the claims adjuster — the best thing was to hear: “After meeting with my claims adjuster this morning, I felt so much better.”

Clients that I’ve known for years — some of the most stoic people — were facing the worst situations their businesses had ever seen. I’ll never forget one of the most well respected dealers in the industry calling me and saying: “I am not exaggerating when I say that this is absolute devastation.”

R&I: From what we gather, the shipping of art and art collections is one of the thornier risk management and risk transfer challenges.  What “tales of the road” can you tell us about art shipment risk management challenges you have faced and overcome?

MP: I handle many art warehouses, packers and shippers, as well as dealers, collectors, museums, foundations, etc. so I understand both sides of these transactions very well. Some of the most common issues that come up involve the documentation shippers require which severely limits their liability. It’s important to understand these technicalities of the shipping process in order to give art clients proper advice.

One of the most interesting situations I’ve found myself in was a client moving into an upper floor in a building in Manhattan. Due to the size of many of the artworks, they had to have the works rigged via crane through a window in the apartment. We had to get the insurance company on board, approving each and every work that was going to be rigged. The job was delayed a number of times due to high winds. On the final day permits were available from the city, the insurance company and I were there and watched the whole process. Little did we know, an earthquake struck NYC at the same time the works were suspended 30 floors in the air. We felt nothing on the ground but the workers in the apartment felt it. Luckily it had no effect on the artwork, but it’s a good story!

R&I: “Event Cancellation Expense” coverage has got to be an area of interest for art exhibitors these days, given the interruptions we have due to terrorist acts and instances of political upheaval. Can you give us your take on this coverage and the appetite for it given the state of the world today?

MP: There have been two instances that had some broad effect on the art world: the volcanic activity in Iceland back in 2010 which canceled flights around the same time as the London Print Show and the Paris Photo show closing early due to the Paris terror attacks.

Directly after the Paris incident, we went to our London broker to develop a program for Event Cancellation coverage. We were able to set up a policy that would cover lost business due to artworks or key employees not arriving (as in the case of air traffic affected by the Volcano) due to things outside of their control as well as part of the event being cancelled. We can add this onto a Lloyd’s Dealer policy or issue as a stand-alone policy. As time passes from these events, people feel less inclined to purchase these kinds of coverage. In 2017 this is a product we are re-emphasizing as it is unique, pragmatic and reasonably priced.

R&I: High net worth insurance is a sector the carriers are devoting a lot of resources to.  Without naming names tell us what you can about some of the private collections you insured and the challenges you faced?

MP: We have some private collectors whose collections are relatively stable with few loans and the occasional purchase but on the flip side, we have private collectors who loan, buy, sell, consign, and collateralize artwork with great frequency. There are some collectors who send us updates every single day about such transactions.

A few of the more challenging, but also very interesting, aspects of these transactions are negotiating complex loans and ensuring proper insurance is in place for loans using the art collection as collateral.  When lending their artwork, different collectors have different requirements for museums and galleries. Sometimes these requirements are quite rigorous and require a good deal of negotiation before the loan terms are agreed upon. These transactions require a nuanced approach — understanding the attitude of the collector toward the loan and ensuring we adequately protect the client while ensuring insurance is not the reason the loan negotiations stall.

R&I: What are some current, pressing risk management issues for museums? We’d imagine cyber threats such as spear-phishing have got to be among them.

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MP: Museums, dealers, and foundations are all being affected by social-engineering threats, wire funds transfer fraud and the like. Almost every week we get notification from a client of a hacking attempt or, unfortunately, a few successful wire transfer frauds where clients have lost money. The Art Dealers Association of America warned their member-dealers of these problems a few times. We have also been emphasizing these attacks with our clients and highlighting the coverages that can help protect them from such attacks (cyber, crime including social engineering, etc.). Unfortunately, while the coverage begins at a very reasonable premium, very few policies have been purchased.

R&I: Do you know how many times you’ve won the Power Broker® designation as a Fine Arts broker, or is it a case of “who’s counting?”

MP:  I honestly don’t know. I took a year off when I had a baby and encouraged my entire team to apply especially since they were the ones who took such great care of my clients while I was on maternity leave. Being in a field dominated by female Power Brokers is very satisfying. As a manager of a team of seven women, I love seeing them grow (some from beginning as our departmental assistants) and receive these kinds of awards. Advocating for the women around me and seeing them succeed is the most rewarding aspect of my job.

For the record, Mary’s Power Broker® win in 2017 was her sixth.-eds

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Report: Manufacturing

More Robots Enter Into Manufacturing Industry

With more jobs utilizing technology advancements, manufacturing turns to cobots to help ease talent gaps.
By: | May 1, 2018 • 6 min read

The U.S. manufacturing industry is at a crossroads.

Faced with a shortfall of as many as two million workers between now and 2025, the sector needs to either reinvent itself by making it a more attractive career choice for college and high school graduates or face extinction. It also needs to shed its image as a dull, unfashionable place to work, where employees are stuck in dead-end repetitive jobs.

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Added to that are the multiple risks caused by the increasing use of automation, sensors and collaborative robots (cobots) in the manufacturing process, including product defects and worker injuries. That’s not to mention the increased exposure to cyber attacks as manufacturers and their facilities become more globally interconnected through the use of smart technology.

If the industry wishes to continue to move forward at its current rapid pace, then manufacturers need to work with schools, governments and the community to provide educational outreach and apprenticeship programs. They must change the perception of the industry and attract new talent. They also need to understand and to mitigate the risks presented by the increased use of technology in the manufacturing process.

“Loss of knowledge due to movement of experienced workers, negative perception of the manufacturing industry and shortages of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) and skilled production workers are driving the talent gap,” said Ben Dollar, principal, Deloitte Consulting.

“The risks associated with this are broad and span the entire value chain — [including]  limitations to innovation, product development, meeting production goals, developing suppliers, meeting customer demand and quality.”

The Talent Gap

Manufacturing companies are rapidly expanding. With too few skilled workers coming in to fill newly created positions, the talent gap is widening. That has been exacerbated by the gradual drain of knowledge and expertise as baby boomers retire and a decline in technical education programs in public high schools.

Ben Dollar, principal, Deloitte Consulting

“Most of the millennials want to work for an Amazon, Google or Yahoo, because they seem like fun places to work and there’s a real sense of community involvement,” said Dan Holden, manager of corporate risk and insurance, Daimler Trucks North America. “In contrast, the manufacturing industry represents the ‘old school’ where your father and grandfather used to work.

“But nothing could be further from the truth: We offer almost limitless opportunities in engineering and IT, working in fields such as electric cars and autonomous driving.”

To dispel this myth, Holden said Daimler’s Educational Outreach Program assists qualified organizations that support public high school educational programs in STEM, CTE (career technical education) and skilled trades’ career development.

It also runs weeklong technology schools in its manufacturing facilities to encourage students to consider manufacturing as a vocation, he said.

“It’s all essentially a way of introducing ourselves to the younger generation and to present them with an alternative and rewarding career choice,” he said. “It also gives us the opportunity to get across the message that just because we make heavy duty equipment doesn’t mean we can’t be a fun and educational place to work.”

Rise of the Cobot

Automation undoubtedly helps manufacturers increase output and improve efficiency by streamlining production lines. But it’s fraught with its own set of risks, including technical failure, a compromised manufacturing process or worse — shutting down entire assembly lines.

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More technologically advanced machines also require more skilled workers to operate and maintain them. Their absence can in turn hinder the development of new manufacturing products and processes.

Christina Villena, vice president of risk solutions, The Hanover Insurance Group, said the main risk of using cobots is bodily injury to their human coworkers. These cobots are robots that share a physical workspace and interact with humans. To overcome the problem of potential injury, Villena said, cobots are placed in safety cages or use force-limited technology to prevent hazardous contact.

“With advancements in technology, such as the Cloud, there are going to be a host of cyber and other risks associated with them.” — David Carlson, U.S. manufacturing and automobile practice leader, Marsh

“Technology must be in place to prevent cobots from exerting excessive force against a human or exposing them to hazardous tools or chemicals,” she said. “Traditional robots operate within a safety cage to prevent dangerous contact. Failure or absence of these guards has led to injuries and even fatalities.”

The increasing use of interconnected devices and the Cloud to control and collect data from industrial control systems can also leave manufacturers exposed to hacking, said David Carlson, Marsh’s U.S. manufacturing and automobile practice leader. Given the relatively new nature of cyber as a risk, however, he said coverage is still a gray area that must be assessed further.

“With advancements in technology, such as the Cloud, there are going to be a host of cyber and other risks associated with them,” he said. “Therefore, companies need to think beyond the traditional risks, such as workers’ compensation and product liability.”

Another threat, said Bill Spiers, vice president, risk control consulting practice leader, Lockton Companies, is any malfunction of the software used to operate cobots. Then there is the machine not being able to cope with the increased workload when production is ramped up, he said.

“If your software goes wrong, it can stop the machine working or indeed the whole manufacturing process,” he said. “[Or] you might have a worker who is paid by how much they can produce in an hour who decides to turn up the dial, causing the machine to go into overdrive and malfunction.”

Potential Solutions

Spiers said risk managers need to produce a heatmap of their potential exposures in the workplace attached to the use of cobots in the manufacturing process, including safety and business interruption. This can also extend to cyber liability, he said.

“You need to understand the risk, if it’s controllable and, indeed, if it’s insurable,” he said. “By carrying out a full risk assessment, you can determine all of the relevant issues and prioritize them accordingly.”

By using collective learning to understand these issues, Joseph Mayo, president, JW Mayo Consulting, said companies can improve their safety and manufacturing processes.

“Companies need to work collaboratively as an industry to understand this new technology and the problems associated with it.” — Joseph Mayo, president, JW Mayo Consulting

“Companies need to work collaboratively as an industry to understand this new technology and the problems associated with it,” Mayo said. “They can also use detective controls to anticipate these issues and react accordingly by ensuring they have the appropriate controls and coverage in place to deal with them.”

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Manufacturing risks today extend beyond traditional coverage, like workers’ compensation, property, equipment breakdown, automobile, general liability and business interruption, to new risks, such as cyber liability.

It’s key to use a specialized broker and carrier with extensive knowledge and experience of the industry’s unique risks.

Stacie Graham, senior vice president and general manager, Liberty Mutual’s national insurance central division, said there are five key steps companies need to take to protect themselves and their employees against these risks. They include teaching them how to use the equipment properly, maintaining the same high quality of product and having a back-up location, as well as having the right contractual insurance policy language in place and plugging any potential coverage gaps.

“Risk managers need to work closely with their broker and carrier to make sure that they have the right contractual controls in place,” she said. “Secondly, they need to carry out on-site visits to make sure that they have the right safety practices and to identify the potential claims that they need to mitigate against.” &

Alex Wright is a U.K.-based business journalist, who previously was deputy business editor at The Royal Gazette in Bermuda. You can reach him at [email protected]