Risk Insider: Jack Hampton

Cyber Security: We’re Blind, Please Help

By: | April 18, 2016 • 2 min read
John (Jack) Hampton is a Professor of Business at St. Peter’s University and a former Executive Director of the Risk and Insurance Management Society (RIMS). His recent book deals with risk management in higher education: "Culture, Intricacies, and Obsessions in Higher Education — Why Colleges and Universities are Struggling to Deliver the Goods." His website is www.jackhampton.com.

A popular video shows a blind man sitting on the ground in a plaza hoping to receive money from those who pass by. His cardboard sign says simply, “I’m blind. Please help.” A few individuals drop money into a cup.

A young woman stops and changes the man’s sign. Suddenly many more individuals give money to the man.

The woman returns and the blind man asks, “What did you do to my sign?”

Her answer is, “I wrote the same but different words.” The changed sign read, “It’s a beautiful day and I can’t see it.”

With the Darknet and throwaway cell phones, terrorists do not need iPhones. Apple versus the FBI is not only about privacy or terrorism. It is about further destabilizing an already vulnerable world of communications.

In our cyber security discussions, we often use the wrong words. This happened in the recent public debate when the FBI demanded an Apple iPhone backdoor to allow law enforcement to track communications among terrorists. In a TV broadcast, “60 Minutes” framed the argument as stopping terrorism versus protecting privacy.

Tim Cook (Apple CEO) and John McAfee (anti-virus guru) argued that law enforcement and the media were missing the point. If Apple complied, terrorists would immediately change tactics.

With the Darknet and throwaway cell phones, terrorists do not need iPhones. Apple versus the FBI is not only about privacy or terrorism. It is about further destabilizing an already vulnerable world of communications.

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In an earlier Risk Insider post, I argued that there were negative consequences to consider should Apple’s “wiper” function be disabled.

The standoff between Apple and the FBI temporarily resolved itself. The FBI cracked the iPhone and withdrew the request to Apple.

In this scenario, we not only used the wrong words…we asked the wrong question. How then can we get the right answer?

Maybe we should ask, “Can Apple help us install a wiper on every computing device and network?” Ten hacker attempts and all the data is erased. We would learn to back up our data real quick.

The feature could help with privacy. Would it have anything to do with criminal behavior? Maybe yes. Maybe no.

Separately, we may be missing the big picture. When Samuel Morse and others developed the telegraph, communications were instantaneously transmitted around the world by wire. Anywhere along a railroad line, hackers could intercept the message. This is the public Internet of 2016.

Is the right question, “What should we do to fix a 21st Century communications system built upon a 19th century telecommunications model?”

Cyber security efforts should not stop with, “I’m blind. Please help.” The words should stir us to action.

We can hope the best and brightest of our cyber security folks help us see a beautiful day by devising a secure Internet that does not impede law and enforcement.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

After 20 years in the business, Navy Pier’s Director of Risk Management values her relationships in the industry more than ever.
By: | June 1, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

Working at Dominick’s Finer Foods bagging groceries. Shortly after I was hired, I was promoted to [cashier] and then to a management position. It taught me great responsibility and it helped me develop the leadership skills I still carry today.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

While working for Hyatt Regency McCormick Place Hotel, one of my responsibilities was to oversee the administration of claims. This led to a business relationship with the director of risk management of the organization who actually owned the property. Ultimately, a position became available in her department and the rest is history.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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The risk management community is doing a phenomenal job in professional development and creating great opportunities for risk managers to network. The development of relationships in this industry is vitally important and by providing opportunities for risk managers to come together and speak about their experiences and challenges is what enables many of us to be able to do our jobs even more effectively.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Attracting, educating and retaining young talent. There is this preconceived notion that the insurance industry and risk management are boring and there could be nothing further from the truth.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

In my 20 years in the industry, the biggest change in risk management and the insurance industry are the various types of risk we look to insure against. Many risks that exist today were not even on our radar 20 years ago.

Gina Kirchner, director of risk management, Navy Pier Inc.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

FM Global. They have been our property carrier for a great number of years and in my opinion are the best in the business.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the US economy or pessimistic and why?

I am optimistic that policies will be put in place with the new administration that will be good for the economy and business.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

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The commercial risks that are of most concern to me are cyber risks, business interruption, and any form of a health epidemic on a global scale. We are dealing with new exposures and new risks that we are truly not ready for.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

My mother has played a significant role in shaping my ideals and values. She truly instilled a very strong work ethic in me. However, there are many men and women in business who have mentored me and have had a significant impact on me and my career as well.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I am most proud of making the decision a couple of years ago to return to school and obtain my [MBA]. It took a lot of prayer, dedication and determination to accomplish this while still working a full time job, being involved in my church, studying abroad and maintaining a household.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

“Heaven Is For Real” by Todd Burpo and Lynn Vincent. I loved the book and the movie.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

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A French restaurant in Paris, France named Les Noces de Jeannette Restaurant à Paris. It was the most amazing food and brings back such great memories.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Israel. My husband and I just returned a few days ago and spent time in Jerusalem, Nazareth, Jericho and Jordan. It was an absolutely amazing experience. We did everything from riding camels to taking boat rides on the Sea of Galilee to attending concerts sitting on the Temple steps. The trip was absolutely life changing.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Many, many years ago … I went parasailing in the Caribbean. I had a great experience and didn’t think about the risk at the time because I was young, single and free. Looking back, I don’t know that I would make the same decision today.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I would have to say the relationships and partnerships I have developed with insurance carriers, brokers and other professionals in the industry. To have wonderful working relationships with such a vast array of talented individuals who are so knowledgeable and to have some of those relationships develop into true friendships is very rewarding.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

My friends and family have a general idea that my position involves claims and insurance. However, I don’t think they fully understand the magnitude of my responsibilities and the direct impact it has on my organization, which experiences more than 9 million visitors a year.




Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]