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Cyber: A Tale of Two Markets

Inconsistencies in cyber insurance policies can lead to "Swiss cheese towers" of coverage.
By: | March 15, 2017 • 5 min read

You know a risk category is mature when people start to refer to it as “traditional.”

The cyber market is a perfect example. Despite the evolving nature of cyber risk, the industry has developed a set of traditional coverages that are well understood by underwriters and buyers alike.

Those policies include both first- and third-party coverage for well-known risks like privacy liability, breach response costs, cyber extortion and lost revenue from a hack; however, non-traditional risks such as physical damage and bodily injury resulting from a cyber breach or system failure pose new threats and challenges.

The cyber insurance market has been growing at roughly 25 to 30 percent per year and is estimated to reach almost $3 billion in 2017, according to Chris Keegan, National Cyber Practice Leader, Beecher Carlson.

As the cyber market continues to grow, buyers need to gain a better understanding of both their traditional and non-traditional exposures and the coverage they have in place to address them. Meanwhile, the insurance industry is working to develop coordinated solutions to more cohesively address the variety of traditional and emerging cyber risks.

Understanding Exposures beyond Liability

Chris Keegan, National Cyber Practice Leader

Though “cyber liability” is the common term for cyber policies, liability is just the tip of the iceberg of cyber exposure.

“We have a taxonomy problem,” Keegan said. “The term ‘cyber liability’ is misleading because cyber is so much bigger than liability. Cyber is property policies. Cyber is recall policies. Cyber is crime policies. The cyber world encompasses many different risk areas.”

The most prominent cyber risk on risk managers’ minds is usually privacy liability. A breach of employees’ and customers’ personal information – whether through theft or negligence – that results in direct costs of notification, hiring forensics investigators and lawyers, and public relations damage control.

Another high-impact but underestimated cyber exposure is business interruption.

If the server hosting your company website or intranet goes down, how will your business be affected and for how long? What if it’s your cloud provider or the platform where you store data? How many locations will it affect? Not only will a system failure interrupt regular business operations, it can also require rebuilding and replacing any lost data or in some cases hardware.

“You have to understand your exposure first before you even start to think about insurance,” Keegan said.

Models are useful tools that paint a detailed picture of the risk.

“Beecher Carlson’s In-Site suite of models applies to traditional risk exposures like privacy liability and to some non-traditional aspects like cyber property damage,” explains Keegan.

The privacy calculator is a maximum probable loss model based on cost information from the largest breaches, fees charged by breach response vendors, and Beecher Carlson’s independent market research. Those data points are combined to create a calculator that estimates the impact of a breach event.

The business interruption model takes into account all of the immediate extra expenses that come with a breach or failure; it also considers how the impact trickles throughout a company’s various locations. This depends on the type of cyber event. A downed network, for example, may have greater impact than a ransomware attack at a specific location.

“You can take all of that information, input the different variables, and see what your maximum loss might be in different scenarios,” Keegan said. “This differs from more traditional business interruption models that focus only on the impact to specific locations.”

Assessing exposure means looking at more than just data. Insurance buyers in every industry have to consider the physical damages that can result from a cyber incident as well.

If the code directing robots at a manufacturing plant fails, for example, it could not only damage an expensive piece of machinery, but also damage the goods it’s producing and present a safety risk to workers in the vicinity.

For an energy producer, a malfunction in software controlling the flow of oil through a pipeline can cause it to blow up and pollute the environment. In the auto industry, cyber risk increases as cars become more digitized, opening them to hack via on-board systems that cause malfunctions.

“If a hacker disables the brakes, for example, there will be property damage to the car and bodily injury to the driver, both caused by a cyber event. The end result is a liability back to the auto manufacturer,” Keegan said.

“Some of this can be covered under traditional general liability and property policies, but there is no guarantee. Not every property/casualty market will offer this coverage.”

This inconsistency leads to what Keegan calls “Swiss cheese towers” of coverage, where there may be coverage for cyber-related physical damage at the primary level, but further up the tower there are holes and gaps.

Mind the Tower Gaps

Cyber coverage can be found in a variety of different policies, resulting in both overlaps and gaps in coverage for some exposures.

Buyers are looking for a cohesive, streamlined solution to cover all of their cyber risks efficiently. And underwriters grapple with how to factor in “silent” cyber coverages, which respond to unexpected cyber events that fall outside the scope of risk for which the coverage was originally built.

Once the extent of a risk is understood, buyers should examine their cyber coverage across all of their policies and look for the gaps that need filling.

Increasingly, property/casualty insurers are able to tack cyber coverage onto property programs on a sub-limited basis, but the terms may vary from form to form. Ultimately, new solutions are needed to handle the full capacity of potential cyber-related losses.

“Excess DIC/DIL – or difference in conditions / difference in limits coverage – is one option that’s not yet offered widely by the markets but presents a promising solution,” Keegan said. Excess DIC/ DIL would sit on top of other designated policies and fill in the gaps between those policies.  Broader cyber coverage that includes traditional and non-traditional risks can be coordinated with property and casualty policies when the details of those policies are disclosed.

“This comes back to knowing your exposure. You need to know which policies this coverage should be in excess of in order to be sure it drops down and fills in gaps where it needs to,” Keegan continued.

Luckily, Keegan and other cyber leaders are working on developing more streamlined solutions.

“Technology is changing rapidly,” he said. “To be effective, the insurance that covers it has to adapt just as rapidly.”

To learn more about Beecher Carlson’s Cyber Risk, Cyber Liability practice, visit http://www.beechercarlson.com/services-delivered/cyber-liability.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Beecher Carlson. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Beecher Carlson is a large account risk management broker that delivers expertise by industry focus and product specialization. We strive to develop new and better technologies to support your business requirements and drive operational excellence.

Risk Management

The Profession

This senior risk manager values his role in helping Varian Medical Systems support research and technologies in the fight against cancer.
By: | September 12, 2017 • 5 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

When I was 15 years old I had a summer job working for the city of Plentywood, mowing grass in the parks and ballfields, emptying garbage cans, hauling waste to the dump, painting crosswalk lines.  A great job for a teenager but I thought getting a college degree and working in an air-conditioned office would be a good plan long term.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

I was enrolled in the University of Montana as a general business student, and I wanted to declare a more specialized major during my sophomore year. I was working for my dad at his insurance agency over the summer, and taking new agent training coursework on property/casualty risks in my spare time, so I had an appreciation for insurance. My dad suggested I research risk management for a career, and I transferred sight unseen to the University of Georgia to enroll in their risk management program. I did an internship as a senior with the risk management department at Sulzer Medica, and they offered me a full time job.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

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We need to do a better job of saying yes. We tend to want to say no to many risks, but there are upside benefits to some risks. If we initiate a collaborative exercise with the risk owners — people who may have unique knowledge about that particular risk — and include a cross section of people from other corporate functions, you can do an effective job of taking the risk apart to analyze it, figure out a way to manage that exposure, and then reap the upside benefits while reducing the downside exposure. That can be done with new products and new service offerings, when there isn’t coverage available for a risk. It’s asking, is there anything we can do to reduce the risk without transferring it?

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

Cyber liability. There’s so much at stake and the bad guys are getting more resourceful every day. At Varian, our first approach is to try to make our systems and products more resilient, so we’re trying to direct resources to preventing it from happening in the first place. It’s a huge reputation risk if one of our products or systems were compromised, so we want to avoid that at all costs.

We need to do a better job of saying yes. We tend to want to say no to many risks, but there are upside benefits to some risks.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

I’ve worked with a number of great ones over the years. We’ve enjoyed a great property insurance relationship with Zurich. Their loss control services are very valuable to us. On the umbrella liability side, it’s been great partnering with companies like Swiss Re and Berkley Life Sciences because they’ve put in the time and effort to understand our unique risk exposures.

R&I: How much business do you do direct versus going through a broker?

One hundred percent through a broker. I view our broker as an extension of our risk management team. We benefit from each team member’s respective area of expertise and experience.

R&I: Is the contingent commission controversy overblown?

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I think so. The brokers were kind of villainized by Spitzer. I think it’s fair for brokers and insurers to make a reasonable profit, and if a portion of their profit came from contingent commissions, I’m fine with that. But I do appreciate the transparency and disclosure that came out as a result of the fiasco.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the US economy or pessimistic and why?

David Collins, Senior Manager, Risk Management, Varian Medical Systems Inc.

While we might be doing fine here in the U.S. from an economic perspective, the Middle East is a mess, and we’re living with nuclear threat from North Korea. But hope springs eternal, so I’m cautiously optimistic. I’m hoping saner minds prevail and our leaders throughout the world work together to make things better.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

My Dad got me started down the insurance and risk path. I’ve also been fortunate to work for or with a number of University of Georgia alumni who’ve been mentors for me. I’ve worked side by side with Karen Epermanis, Michael Rousseau, and Elisha Finney. And I’ve worked with Daniel Dean in his capacity as a broker.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

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Raising my kids. I have a 15-year-old and 12-year-old, and they’re making mom and dad proud of the people they’re turning into.

On a professional level, a recent one would be the creation and implementation of our global travel risk program, which was a combined effort between security, travel and risk functions.

We have a huge team of service personnel around the world, traveling to customer sites to do maintenance and repair. We needed a way to track, monitor and communicate with them. We may need to make security arrangements or vet their lodging in some circumstances.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

My 12-year-old son thought my job responsibilities could be summed up as a “professional worrier.” And that’s not too far off.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

Varian’s mission is to focus energy on saving lives. Proper administration of the risk function puts the company in a better position to financially support research that improves products and capabilities, helps to educate health care providers and support cancer care in general. It means more lives saved from a terrible disease. I’m proud to contribute toward that.

When you meet someone whose cancer has been successfully treated with one of our products, it’s a powerful reward.




Katie Siegel is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]