Cyber Threats

Cyber Challenges Still Evolving

A lack of available data hamstrings cyber-risk underwriting, no matter what the exposure.
By: | May 26, 2015 • 4 min read

Some chief information security officers fail to see the value of standalone cyber-risk coverage, while some brokers give the impression that traditional policies cover many of the same risks.

These factors have contributed to surprisingly low recent take-up on standalone cyber coverage, according to Charles Cowan, counsel to law firm Drinker Biddle & Reath’s insurance transactional and regulatory team.

Advertisement




Cowan and Andrea Best, a partner with Drinker Biddle, addressed four emerging areas of cyber-related risk on May 19 in the Old Lloyd’s Library, built in 1928 and now in the basement at Lime Street. That very day, Lloyd’s announced its move into cyber coverage in Poland.

In the heavily wood-paneled atmosphere of the past, the speakers addressed four potential horsemen of the digital apocalypse.

Cyber-risk itself, drones, autonomous vehicles, and ride/car share all fall under the cyber umbrella and share a primary reliance on data that is largely not yet available, given the newness of the risks. The lack of data means that none of these risks is yet properly understood.

Cyber

“First and foremost in cyber risk,” said Cowan, “is the need for data. Not a lot of reliable data exists about incidents and where future potential attacks might be, or of what size.”

Cowan added that little litigation has yet taken place to clarify the validity of exclusions. The wording of the standard war exclusion “requires a hostile act by a foreign Government,” he said, “without naming names.” The Sony hack, reportedly by the Government of North Korea, came to mind.

Following another hack that exposed some 80 million customer and employee records at Anthem Health Insurance, the company notified and conducted its correspondence with its customers on paper, Cowan said. (Target experienced further opportunist email hacking after advising its customers by email that the personal data of up to 70 million customers, including credit card numbers, had been stolen in late 2013.)

“For larger breaches, costs can be astronomical,” Cowan said, citing a three-year-old U.S. report that valued the average stolen record at about $180. Cowan, who had left Lloyd’s three weeks earlier, is now working with the Department of Homeland Security on garnering more timely information.

Drones

About 80 percent of commercial unmanned aerial systems, or drones, are used in agriculture. The U.S. economy might expect to earn $82 billion from the use and knock-on effects of drones by 2025, and the FAA is due to issue a set of standards in this as-yet largely unregulated area.

Liability issues abound: criminal activity, matters of privacy and trespass, nuisance and general danger, air traffic problems, misdirected payloads, and of course hacking. “Any system is hackable,” Cowan said.

Autonomous Vehicles

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers forecasts that as many as 75 percent of all vehicles, some with removable steering wheels, are expected to be autonomous by 2030, Best said. Legislation in the U.S. is being enacted at the state level (five states plus Washington, D.C.), or has failed (12 states), or is not being considered at all.

Autonomous vehicles will require sensors for vehicle-to-vehicle communication, “but we’ll also have to have sensors on buildings, bridges, traffic lights and other objects we’ll have to navigate around,” Best said.

“The ultimate question, if this technology really takes off, and is so safe, is how much of an automobile insurance coverage market will there be left?” — Andrea Best, partner, Drinker Biddle & Reath

It is not yet clear who will need coverage. Manufacturers of the vehicles? Of component parts? Of the sensors? One known unknown is whether driver premiums for autonomous vehicles will fall, due to the lowered risk, or increase for traditional hands-on drivers.

“The ultimate question, if this technology really takes off, and is so safe, is how much of an automobile insurance coverage market will there be left?” Best asked.

Coverage challenges include the reliability and vulnerability of the technology, the adaptability of the driving public, and the hackability of the autonomous systems.

“These are probably just interim challenges,” Best said. “Given the level of investment, and how much of a push there is for (autonomous vehicles), these issues will fall away.”

Ride/Car Sharing

The former will be familiar from transportation network companies such as Uber, which arrange one-time shared rides on short notice, and others that arrange transportation for a fee using online technology platforms.

Advertisement




The latter includes peer-to-peer car rentals organized by program administrators (such as RelayRides and Getaround) for short periods of time.

“Both services present new insurance coverage challenges,” Best said.

Ride-sharing is typically excluded from personal auto policies, creating coverage gaps. NAIC has issued a white paper to help state insurance regulators, and legislation is pending in more than 35 states. Similar coverage gaps exist in the car-sharing realm.

As if these four risks were not enough to digest, on the subject of emerging risks, in Best’s words, “we could have covered any number of topics and be here for hours.”

Roger Crombie is a United Kingdom-based columnist for Risk & Insurance®. He can be reached at [email protected]

Risk Management

The Profession

Pinnacle Entertainment’s VP of enterprise risk management says he’s inspired by Disney’s approach to risk management.
By: | November 1, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

Bus boy at a fine dining restaurant.

R&I: How did you come to work in this industry?

I sent a résumé to Harrah’s Entertainment on a whim. It took over 30 hours of interviewing to get that job, but it was well worth it.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

Advertisement




The Chinese citizen (never positively identified) who stood in front of a column of tanks in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. That kind of courage is undeniable, and that image is unforgettable. I hope we can all be that passionate about something at least once in our lives.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

Cyber risk, but more narrowly, cyber-extortion. I think state sponsored bad actors are getting more and more sophisticated, and the risk is that they find a way to control entire systems.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Training and breaking horses. When I was in high school, I worked on a lot of farms. I did everything from building fences to putting up hay. It was during this time that I found I had a knack for horses. They would tolerate me getting real close, so it was natural I started working more and more with them.

Eventually, I was putting a saddle on a few and before I knew it I was in that saddle riding a horse that had never been ridden before.

I admit I had some nervous moments, but I was never thrown off. It taught me that developing genuine trust early is very important and is needed by all involved. Nothing of any real value happens without it.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

Advertisement




Setting very aggressive goals and then meeting and exceeding those goals with a team. Sharing team victories is the ultimate reward.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Disney World. The sheer size of the place is awe inspiring. And everything works like a finely tuned clock.

There is a reason that hospitality companies send their people there to be trained on guest service. Disney World does it better than anyone else.

As a hospitality executive, I always learn something new whenever I am there.

James Cunningham, vice president, enterprise risk management, Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc.

The risks that Disney World faces are very similar to mine — on a much larger scale. They are complex and across the board. From liability for the millions of people they host as their guests each year, to the physical location of the park, to their vendor partnerships; their approach to risk management has been and continues to be innovative and a model that I learn from and I think there are lessons there for everybody.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

We are doing a much better job of getting involved in a meaningful way in our daily operations and demonstrating genuine value to our organizations.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Educating and promoting the career with young people.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

Being able to tell the Pinnacle story. It’s a great one and it wasn’t being told. I believe that the insurance markets now understand who we are and what we stand for.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

Advertisement




John Matthews, who is now retired, formerly with Aon and Caesar’s Palace. John is an exceptional leader who demonstrated the value of putting a top-shelf team together and then letting them do their best work. I model my management style after him.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

I read mostly biographies and autobiographies. I like to read how successful people became successful by overcoming their own obstacles. Jay Leno, Jack Welch, Bill Harrah, etc. I also enjoyed the book and movie “Money Ball.”

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

Ice water when it’s hot, coffee when it’s cold, and an adult beverage when it’s called for.

R&I: What does your family think you do?

In my family, I’m the “Safety Geek.”

R&I:  What’s your favorite restaurant?

Vegas is a world-class restaurant town. No matter what you are hungry for, you can find it here. I have a few favorites that are my “go-to’s,” depending on the mood and who I am with.

If you’re in town, you should try to have at least one meal off the strip. For that, I would suggest you get reservations (you’ll need them) at Herbs and Rye. It’s a great little restaurant that is always lively. The food is tremendous, and the service is always on point. They make hand-crafted cocktails that are amazing.

My favorite Mexican restaurant is Lindo Michoacan. There are three in town, and I prefer the one in Henderson as it has the best view of the valley. For seafood, you can never go wrong with Joe’s in Caesar’s Palace.




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]