Protest Insurance

Cleveland Insures Against Protesters

The city quintupled its initial policy coverage to $50 million for the GOP Convention.
By: | July 12, 2016 • 2 min read

The City of Cleveland will pay $9.5 million to purchase $50 million of protest insurance coverage ahead of the four-day Republican National Convention that begins July 18.

The city quintupled its original proposed coverage amount, which would have had the city pay $1.5 million for a $10 million policy.

“The $1.5 million for $10 million coverage was always just a placeholder,” City spokesman Dan Williams told Risk & Insurance®. “We felt it was the best level of coverage for what we needed.”

Protest insurance coverage is required for any event that has been deemed by the U.S. Secret Service as a “National Special Security Event.”

The protest policy is liability insurance that includes incident insurance to cover potential lawsuits, private property insurance to cover any damage to property, and vehicles and equipment insurance to cover others coming to the convention with their own vehicles and equipment, Williams wrote.

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The policy is required for any event that has been deemed by the U.S. Secret Service as a “National Special Security Event,” which also includes the Democratic National Convention, visits by the Catholic pope and G8 summits, among other events.

The city’s Board of Control increased the insurance coverage on the recommendation of its broker, Aon Risk Services Northeast, which polled 40 insurance providers, according to Sharon Dumas, the city’s finance director.

“They analyzed the national trend of conflicts and the risks associated with the convention, and we concurred,” Dumas said to Cleveland.com.

The Secret Service, FBI, Cleveland and Ohio State Police, the National Guard, and thousands of police officers from around the country will work together over the course of the week to ensure peaceful demonstrations — both for and against Trump, according to reports.

The groups scheduled to travel to Cleveland for the convention include anti-Trump demonstrators, a white nationalist group and the anti-gay Westboro Baptist Church.

Calvin Williams, police chief, City of Cleveland

Calvin Williams, police chief, City of Cleveland

Preparing for potentially violent demonstrations, the city’s police department has partnered with law enforcement agencies throughout the country “to ensure that we have an adequate number of law enforcement officers to staff the needs of the convention,” Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams wrote on the department’s website as well as its Facebook page. \

However, after shootings in Dallas and Baton Rouge led to the deaths of eight officers, some law enforcement agencies have rescinded offers to send officers to help at the convention.

But Williams remains confident. “Our officers have trained with many partnering agencies at the local, state and federal level to ensure that the highest safety standards are maintained,” he wrote.

“Throughout the course of planning for the RNC, our officers have undergone hours of training relative to many subjects. Although not all training can be discussed or demonstrated as law enforcement tactics are sensitive, the training has been both comprehensive and valuable.”

However, he did say the department purchased 300 bicycles outfitted specifically for “law enforcement purposes,” to be used by police officers who became certified riders after training through the Law Enforcement Bicycle Association.

Williams ended his letter on an optimistic note: “This is an exciting time for our great city. This is an historic event and we are not likely to see anything like this within the footprint of Cleveland again soon. I am looking forward to a safe event and I thank you for your support.”

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in California. She has more than two decades of journalism experience and expertise in financial writing. She can be reached at [email protected]

Risk Management

The Profession

As a professor of business, Jack Hampton knows firsthand the positive impact education has on risk managers as they tackle growing risks.
By: | April 9, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

Ellen Thrower, president (retired), The College of Insurance, introduced me to the importance of insurance as a component of risk management. Further, she encouraged me to explore strategic and operational risk as foundation topics shaping the role of the modern risk manager.

Chris Mandel, former president of RIMS and Risk Manager of the Year, introduced me to the emerging area of enterprise risk management. He helped me recognize the need to align hazard, strategic, operational and financial risk into a single framework. He gave me the perspective of ERM in a high-tech environment, using USAA as a model program that later won an excellence award for innovation.

Bob Morrell, founder and former CEO of Riskonnect, showed me how technology could be applied to solving serious risk management and governance problems. He created a platform that made some of my ideas practical and extended them into a highly-successful enterprise that served risk and governance management needs of major corporations.

R&I: How did you come to work in this industry?

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From a background in corporate finance and commercial banking, I accepted the position of provost of The College of Insurance. Recognizing my limited prior knowledge in the field, I became a student of insurance and risk management leading to authorship of books on hazard and financial risk. This led to industry consulting, as well as to the development of graduate-level courses and concentrations in MBA programs.

R&I: What was your first job?

The provost position was the first job I had in the industry, after serving as dean of the Seton Hall University School of Business and founding The Princeton Consulting Group. Earlier positions were in business development with Marine Transport Lines, consulting in commercial banking and college professorships.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

Creating a risk management concentration in the MBA program at Saint Peter’s, co-founding the Russian Risk Management Society (RUSRISK), and writing “Fundamentals of Enterprise Risk Management” and the “AMA Handbook of Financial Risk Management.”

A few years ago, I expanded into risk management in higher education. From 2017 into 2018, Rowman and Littlefield published my four books that address risks facing colleges and universities, professors, students and parents.

Jack Hampton, Professor of Business, St. Peter’s University

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

The Godfather. I see it as a story of managing risk, even as the behavior of its leading characters create risk for others.

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

Jameson’s Irish whiskey. Mixed with a little ice, it is a serious rival for Johnny Walker Gold scotch and Jack Daniel’s Tennessee whiskey.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Mount Etna, Taormina, and Agrigento, Sicily. I actually supervised an MBA program in Siracusa and learned about risk from a new perspective.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

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Army Airborne training and jumping out of an airplane. Fortunately, I never had to do it in combat even though I served in Vietnam.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

George C. Marshall, one of the most decorated military leaders in American history, architect of the economic recovery program for Europe after World War II, and recipient of the 1953 Nobel Peace Prize. For Marshall, it was not just about winning the war. It was also about winning the peace.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

Sharing lessons with colleagues and students by writing, publishing and teaching. A professor with a knowledge of risk management does not only share lessons. The professor is also a student when MBA candidates talk about the risks they manage every day.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

Sensitizing for-profit, nonprofit and governmental agencies to the exposures and complexities facing their organizations. Sometimes we focus too much on strategies that sound good but do not withstand closer examination. Risk managers help organizations make better decisions.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

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Developing executive training programs to help risk managers assume C-suite positions in organizations. Insurance may be a good place to start but so is an MBA degree. The Risk and Insurance Management Society recognizes the importance of a wide range of risk knowledge. Colleges and universities need to catch up with RIMS.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

Cyber risk and its impact on hazard, operational and financial strategies. A terrorist can take down a building. A cyber-criminal can take down much more.

R&I: What does your family think you do?

My family members think I’m a professor. They do not seem to be too interested in my views on risk management.




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]