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Risk Insider: Jack Hampton

The Changing Concept of Privacy

By: | December 7, 2016 • 2 min read
John (Jack) Hampton is a Professor of Business at St. Peter’s University and a former Executive Director of the Risk and Insurance Management Society (RIMS). His recent book deals with risk management in higher education: "Culture, Intricacies, and Obsessions in Higher Education — Why Colleges and Universities are Struggling to Deliver the Goods." His website is www.jackhampton.com.

Classical Chinese Mandarin had no word that conveyed the modern meaning of privacy. Its closest term conveyed a message close to “shameful secret,” as when a person wanted to hide a disgraceful behavior from others.

Everybody knows the meaning of “privacy.” It is freedom from being observed or disturbed by others. Legally, it is a right to control access to our personal information.

Is the issue of privacy about to change as a major theme in our society?

We can ask German Chancellor Angela Merkel, “Did you feel violated when you learned the U.S. National Security Agency listened to and recorded your cell phone conversations?”

We could contact 32 million members of Ashley Madison, the commercial website that facilitates discreet sexual affairs for married adults. Did bad things happen after the release of their full names, home addresses, and credit card transactions?

We might be curious about what happened to Ashley Madison’s clients in Saudi Arabia where adultery is a crime punishable by death.

Curiosity is one thing. Managing the exposure from a privacy breach is a potential disaster.

Risk managers are concerned about privacy violations that increasingly are coming from out of nowhere. We should be concerned too.

Ask Erin Andrews, the ESPN reporter who was videotaped naked in her hotel room. A jury verdict was $55 million from Marriott for violation of privacy.

You can’t ask Tyler Clementi, an 18-year-old student at Rutgers University. He jumped to his death from the George Washington Bridge after his roommate used a webcam and shared an Internet video of Clementi kissing another man.

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Privacy violation is big business. The collection of our private data is a $300 billion-a-year industry employing millions of people in the United States. They gather information without regard to how it will be used. They digitally scour Facebook for information about people going on vacation, match it with email addresses, and sell it to vendors in destination locations who promote events for tourists. Unintentionally, the information can wind up in the hands of burglars who break into empty homes.

Elsewhere, recruiters uncover personal data not volunteered in applications for employment. Unscrupulous proprietary schools identify financially struggling students and put them into debt pursuing programs they will not complete.

The quest for sensitive data and other secrets is part of a new discipline called “business analytics.”

Privacy violation is big business. The collection of our private data is a $300 billion-a-year industry employing millions of people in the United States. They gather information without regard to how it will be used.

The definition is quite harmless. It refers to continuous and repeated exploration and investigation of data to improve performance.

It uses the availability of the massive amount of data collected by companies, governments, and other parties who have little or no respect for privacy.

The situation is complicated because we actually train people to violate privacy. Business analytics is a “hot” academic program on college campuses. Students learn how to pore through our personal lives to create “meaning” that will be used for or against us by complete strangers.

What is the reality of personal privacy? It’s gone.

Politicians use business analytics to find friendly voters. The media tracks down hidden stories that inform, entertain, or titillate. Lawyers pursue clients. Employers dig for conflicts of interest. Netflix manages its business based on our viewing patterns.

Everybody is sharing the data. Nobody is taking much time to respect privacy.

We might conclude with a mission statement that could apply to a modern company.

“We have to be forthright with our customers. We must earn their confidence. We have to show them we care about them and will protect them. Then, we can find their shameful secrets and invade their privacy.”

The Profession

Curt Gross

This director of risk management sees cyber, IP and reputation risks as evolving threats, but more formal education may make emerging risk professionals better prepared.
By: | June 1, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

My first non-professional job was working at Burger King in high school. I learned some valuable life lessons there.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

After taking some accounting classes in high school, I originally thought I wanted to be an accountant. After working on a few Widgets Inc. projects in college, I figured out that wasn’t what I really wanted to do. Risk management found me. The rest is history. Looking back, I am pleased with how things worked out.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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I think we do a nice job on post graduate education. I think the ARM and CPCU designations give credibility to the profession. Plus, formal college risk management degrees are becoming more popular these days. I know The University of Akron just launched a new risk management bachelor’s program in the fall of 2017 within the business school.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

I think we could do a better job with streamlining certificates of insurance or, better yet, evaluating if they are even necessary. It just seems to me that there is a significant amount of time and expense around generating certificates. There has to be a more efficient way.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

Selfishly, I prefer a destination with a direct flight when possible. RIMS does a nice job of selecting various locations throughout the country. It is a big job to successfully pull off a conference of that size.

Curt Gross, Director of Risk Management, Parker Hannifin Corp.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

Definitely the change in nontraditional property & casualty exposures such as intellectual property and reputational risk. Those exposures existed way back when but in different ways. As computer networks become more and more connected and news travels at a more rapid pace, it just amplifies these types of exposures. Sometimes we have to think like the perpetrator, which can be difficult to do.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

I hate to sound cliché — it’s quite the buzz these days — but I would have to say cyber. It’s such a complex risk involving nontraditional players and motives. Definitely a challenging exposure to get your arms around. Unfortunately, I don’t think we’ll really know the true exposure until there is more claim development.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

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Our captive insurance company. I’ve been fortunate to work for several companies with a captive, each one with a different operating objective. I view a captive as an essential tool for a successful risk management program.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

I can’t point to just one. I have and continue to be lucky to work for really good managers throughout my career. Each one has taken the time and interest to develop me as a professional. I certainly haven’t arrived yet and welcome feedback to continue to try to be the best I can be every day.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I would like to think I have and continue to bring meaningful value to my company. However, I would have to say my family is my proudest accomplishment.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

Favorite movie is definitely “Good Will Hunting.”

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

Tough question to narrow down. If my wife ran a restaurant, it would be hers. We try to have dinner as a family as much as possible. If I had to pick one restaurant though, I would say Fire Food & Drink in Cleveland, Ohio. Chef Katz is a culinary genius.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

The Grand Canyon. It is just so vast. A close second is Stonehenge.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

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A few, actually. Up until a few years ago, I owned a sport bike (motorcycle). Of course, I wore the proper gear, took a safety course and read a motorcycle safety book. Also, I have taken a few laps in a NASCAR [race car] around Daytona International Speedway at 180 mph. Most recently, trying to ride my daughter’s skateboard.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

The Dalai Lama. A world full of compassion, tolerance and patience and free of discrimination, racism and violence, while perhaps idealistic, sounds like a wonderful place to me.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I really enjoy the company I work for and my role, because I get the opportunity to work with various functions. For example, while mostly finance, I get to interact with legal, human resources, employee health and safety, to name a few.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

I asked my son. He said, “Risk management and insurance.” (He’s had the benefit of bring-your-kid-to-work day.)

Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]