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Risk Insider: Martin Eveleigh

Captives and Risk Pooling: An Overview

By: | January 13, 2017 • 2 min read
Martin Eveleigh is Chairman of Atlas Insurance Management, which he formed in 2002. He specializes in designing alternative risk transfer programs – particularly risk pools – and captive structures. He can be reached at [email protected]

Increased interest in captive insurance across a spectrum of industries has led to recent growth in captive insurance company formation. Leading the surge are middle-market organizations who see captives as an attractive option that can complement their existing commercial insurance programs.

Sharing Third-Party Risk

Setting up a captive can be an option for managing risks, particularly those not addressed by commercial insurance, but organizations must understand the requirements necessary for a company to be recognized as a bona-fide insurance company.

One requirement is the need for risk distribution. Enough independent risks of unrelated parties must be pooled to invoke the actuarial law of large numbers. Distribution of disparate risks is one requirement by the IRS for the captive to be considered an insurance company for federal tax purposes.

For small to middle-market companies, it can be difficult to satisfy this requirement within their own insured programs. However, there are options available to the captive owner. One popular method is to participate in a risk pool which provides a reinsurance structure where risks of a number of captives are blended and shared.

Participants pay a portion of their direct written premium to the pool to buy reinsurance. They then assume an equivalent amount of risks from fellow participants. This concept has been underscored in IRS Revenue Ruling 2002-89, a safe harbor rule stating that captives with at least 50 percent of premiums from third parties satisfies the requirement for risk distribution.

Risk Pool Governance and Control

In addition to risk distribution at the individual level, best practices dictate that risk pools employ governance and control protocols to ensure structural stability and financial integrity. These include: providing timely and accurate reporting, demonstrating underwriting control with new and renewing participants, and maintaining the overall financial strength of the pool.

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The risk pool must be independent, or run separately from the members, including separate books and records. The focus of pool managers is to protect all participating members; no single member’s needs are to take precedence.

Risk pools also must demonstrate risk distribution. This requirement does not just fall on the individual member captive; the pool itself must meet the same distribution requirement by having a sufficient number of members and an even spread of risk among those members.

Guidance: The Key to Understanding

Risk diversification can mean that individual participants may assume risks they are not familiar with or do not fully understand. Furthermore, it is likely that participants may be unable to control assumed risks.

Strategies to mitigate this include creating a pool of low frequency risks where loss activity is low, or conversely, a pool of high frequency risks in which the exposure is more easily identified and less volatile. The potential for misunderstanding the downside of risk pooling underscores the need for an experienced adviser.

Members should understand benefits and obligations of participation, as well as how transactions within the pool are handled.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

2018 Risk All Stars

Masters of Risk

The concept of risk mastery and ownership, as displayed by the 2018 Risk All Stars, includes not simply seeking to control outcomes but taking full responsibility for them.
By: | September 14, 2018 • 3 min read

People talk a lot about how risk managers can get a seat at the table. The discussion implies that the risk manager is an outsider, striving to get the ear or the attention of an insider, the CEO or CFO.

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But there are risk managers who go about things in a different way. And the 2018 Risk All Stars are prime examples of that.

These risk managers put in gear their passion, creativity and perseverance to become masters of a situation, pushing aside any notion that they are anything other than key players.

Goodyear’s Craig Melnick had only been with the global tire maker a few months when Hurricane Harvey dumped a record amount of rainfall on Houston.

Brilliant communication between Melnick and his new teammates gave him timely and valuable updates on the condition of manufacturing locations. Melnick remained in Akron, mastering the situation by moving inventory out of the storm’s path and making sure remediation crews were lined up ahead of time to give Goodyear its best leg up once the storm passed and the flood waters receded.

Goodyear’s resiliency in the face of the storm gave it credibility when it went to the insurance markets later that year for renewals. And here is where we hear a key phrase, produced by Kevin Garvey, one of Goodyear’s brokers at Aon.

“The markets always appreciate a risk manager who demonstrates ownership,” Garvey said, in what may be something of an understatement.

These risk managers put in gear their passion, creativity and perseverance to become masters of a situation, pushing aside any notion that they are anything other than key players.

Dianne Howard, a 2018 Risk All Star and the director of benefits and risk management for the Palm Beach County School District, achieved ownership of $50 million in property storm exposures for the district.

With FEMA saying it wouldn’t pay again for district storm losses it had already paid for, Howard went to the London markets and was successful in getting coverage. She also hammered out a deal in London that would partially reimburse the district if it suffered a mass shooting and needed to demolish a building, like what happened at Sandy Hook in Connecticut.

2018 Risk All Star Jim Cunningham was well-versed enough to know what traditional risk management theories would say when hospitality workers were suffering too many kitchen cuts. “Put a cut-prevention plan in place,” is the traditional wisdom.

But Cunningham, the vice president of risk management for the gaming company Pinnacle Entertainment, wasn’t satisfied with what looked to him like a Band-Aid approach.

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Instead, he used predictive analytics, depending on his own team to assemble company-specific data, to determine which safety measures should be used company wide. The result? Claims frequency at the company dropped 60 percent in the first year of his program.

Alumine Bellone, a 2018 Risk All Star and the vice president of risk management for Ardent Health Services, faced an overwhelming task: Create a uniform risk management program when her hospital group grew from 14 hospitals in three states to 31 hospitals in seven.

Bellone owned the situation by visiting each facility right before the acquisition and again right after, to make sure each caregiving population was ready to integrate into a standardized risk management system.

After consolidating insurance policies, Bellone achieved $893,000 in synergies.

In each of these cases, and in more on the following pages, we see examples of risk managers who weren’t just knocking on the door; they were owning the room. &

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Risk All Stars stand out from their peers by overcoming challenges through exceptional problem solving, creativity, clarity of vision and passion.

See the complete list of 2018 Risk All Stars.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]