2017 RIMS

Blockchain Pros and Cons

If barriers to implementation are brought down, blockchain offers potential for financial institutions.
By: | April 25, 2017 • 4 min read

With hackers growing more sophisticated every day, companies and their customers could benefit from some bulked-up cyber defenses.

Blockchain technology is one innovation trying to provide a solution against hacking and fraud, but its drawbacks may stall implementation for the foreseeable future.

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“[Blockchain] is there; everyone is aware of it. It will pop one of these days, but no one knows how to insure it. It takes time for insurance to catch up because there’s no loss history,” said Jimmy Kirtland, VP, corporate risk management, Voya Financial, presenting on the topic at the RIMS 2017 conference in Philadelphia.

Currently, financial transactions are recorded through a central authority like a bank, which keeps one ledger for all parties involved. It provides a reliable record of ownership and asset flows, but it’s easily hackable. A cyber criminal only needs to gain access to that one ledger to place every party – and all of their transaction data – at risk.

Blockchain, on the other hand, is an example of a distributed ledger. There’s no central authority, and every participant has their own copy.

Brian Scarbrough, partner, Jenner & Block LLP, compared blockchain to “one giant interactive and global spreadsheet,” which displays real-time changes so every copy is identical, and which no single user controls.

The advantage of this distributed model is that it’s much harder to hack or manipulate.

In a blockchain model, transactions are organized into discrete “blocks,” which are time stamped, encrypted and linked to the previous block, creating the chain. Each block can only be added to the chain if there is consensus among participants that it has been verified.

Without consensus, no transaction is recorded.

So, if a hacker gains access to one of the local copies of the ledger and tries to retroactively change a transaction, it means he must also change every block that comes after that transaction. But that creates a split in the chain, and other participants’ copies will differ from the hacked ledger. Because consensus is required, the participants in a blockchain ledger would easily be able to identify and reject the change.

Brian Scarbrough, Partner, Jenner & Block LLP

“Cryptography is used to validate and confirm transactions,” Scarbrough said.

Through complex mathematical equations, cryptography encodes transaction data. It also acts to cut out trusted intermediaries that normally do data verification and encryption.

“Cryptography solves the threat of multiple networks being hacked,” Scarbrough said. “Instead of trusting one central party, users trust a network of participants that keep each other honest through mass collaboration because they have to vote on each transaction to be added to blockchain, and cryptography aids that process.”

Insurance Impact

Blockchain technology, through its ability to track and store data including policy applications and renewals, can potentially help to streamline the underwriting process. Records of ownership could also prove useful in insurance disputes and in claims handling.

However, running encryption and decryption software 24/7 requires a lot of energy and resources.

“Running blockchain around the clock requires massive amounts of electricity and is very capital intensive,” Kirtland said. There is also a lack of mature infrastructure, lack of scalability, the potential for fraud through collusion, and unanswered questions around regulation and legality.

There’s also uncertainty around how cyber coverage would respond to failures of a blockchain system. Some cyber policies have only just begun to incorporate language addressing bitcoin, which is an example of blockchain technology.

“Running blockchain around the clock requires massive amounts of electricity and is very capital intensive.” — Jimmy Kirtland, VP, corporate risk management, Voya Financial

Bitcoin incentivizes people to invest their resources in the data mining and hashing necessary to keep blockchain transactions going by rewarding them with bitcoins. With other blockchain applications, though, incentives are still lacking.

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As demonstrated through the number and participation of session attendees, blockchain is garnering a lot of interest, but brings up just as many questions.

Audience members had uncertainties around the technical aspects, and the technology’s exposure to hacking. But if the industry can gain clarity around those uncertainties, and if cost of implementation goes down, blockchain models could drastically change the way insurers and other financial institutions do business.

Additional stories from RIMS 2017:

Embrace the Internet of Things

Risk managers can use IoT for data analytics and other risk mitigation needs, but connected devices also offer a multitude of exposures.

Feeling Unprepared to Deal With Risks

Damage to brand and reputation ranked as the top risk concern of risk managers throughout the world.

Reviewing Medical Marijuana Claims

Liberty Mutual appears to be the first carrier to create a workflow process for evaluating medical marijuana expense reimbursement requests.

Cyber Threat Will Get More Difficult

Companies should focus on response, resiliency and recovery when it comes to cyber risks.

RIMS Conference Held in Birthplace of Insurance in US

Carriers continue their vital role of helping insureds mitigate risks and promote safety.

Resilience in Face of Cyber

New cyber model platforms will help insurers better manage aggregation risk within their books of business.

Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

Verizon’s risk manager David Cammarata loves when his team can make a real impact on the bottom line.
By: | May 2, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

I was a financial analyst with the N.J. Casino Control Commission.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

I was told at a Christmas luncheon in 2003 that I was being promoted into a new job.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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I think the risk management community is getting a lot better at utilizing big data and analytics to manage risk. Significant improvements have been made, but there is still much more room for improvement.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

I think that the insurance and brokerage communities need to really start thinking about what this industry is going to look like in 10 years. They need to start addressing how they are going to remain relevant. I think that major disruptions to existing business models will occur and that these disruptions combined with innovation and technological advances may catch many of today’s industry leaders by surprise.

David Cammarata, assistant treasurer, risk management and insurance, Verizon Communications Inc.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

San Diego, any year.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

I think the advent of cyber risk and cyber insurance. For several years it has been, and it continues to be, the main topic of discussion at industry meetings.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

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I think the most scary scenarios include a nuclear, biological, chemical or radiological event, a widespread global health epidemic and/or a widespread state sponsored cyber shutdown.

R&I: How much business do you do direct versus going through a broker?

We do almost all of our business through a broker.

R&I: Is the contingent commission controversy overblown?

No. It’s a conflict.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the U.S. economy or pessimistic and why?

Optimistic because hopefully President Trump’s policies (lower taxes and less regulation) will be pro-business and good for the economy.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

My dad, who passed away many years ago. He was very influential during the formative years of my career. He taught me how important integrity and reputation were to your brand and he had a very strong work ethic.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I would have to say raising two awesome kids. My daughter is graduating from James Madison University this year as co-valedictorian. My son is finishing his sophomore year at Rutgers and has near perfect grades. But more importantly, both of my kids have turned out to be really good people.

R&I: How many emails do you get in a day?

A lot.

“I love it when the risk management organization is able to contribute in a way that makes a real impact to the corporation’s overall objectives. On several occasions we have been able to make real contributions to the bottom line.”

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

“My Cousin Vinny.” That movie makes me laugh no matter how many times I watch it.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

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My dad used to take me to a place called Chick & Nello’s. It was an Italian place that did not have a menu. They came to your table and told you the two or three items they were making that day. The food was out of this world.

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

Iced tea. The non-alcoholic kind.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

I can think of several places but for me it would be a tie between India and Italy. India just has such a different culture and way of life and Rome has breathtaking historical sites.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Well, one of the best thrill rides I’ve been on was Kingda Ka at Great Adventure. It feels risky but probably isn’t all that risky. I flew in a prop plane with my brother-in-law one time … that felt kind of risky. I have also parasailed, does that count? I think it definitely has to be driving on the N.J. Turnpike day in and day out.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

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What about the Fukushima 50? I don’t think I could have done what they did.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I love it when the risk management organization is able to contribute in a way that makes a real impact to the corporation’s overall objectives. On several occasions we have been able to make real contributions to the bottom line.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

I don’t think they really know. My children see me as dad; others just see me as an executive with Verizon.




Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]