2017 Power Broker

2017 Power Broker® Rising Stars

Rising Stars are winners and finalists in Risk & Insurance®’s Power Broker® award who are being recognized as future leaders of the industry. Since the launch of this designation, more than 325 brokers have been so recognized.

Risk & Insurance® celebrates these Rising Stars for their  creativity, exceptional customer service and industry knowledge in finding solutions for their clients.

Chris Ainscough, 31
Aon, Cleveland
Health Care

Yogesh Amar, 32
Marsh, New York
Utilities

Jay Brancaleone, 36
Aon, Boston
Private Client

William Bray, 31
Wells Fargo, Houston
Real Estate

 

 

Wesley Bryan, 35
Wortham, Houston
Marine

Dawn Buelow, 39
Marsh, Chicago
Pharmaceutical

 

Alex Burton, 29
Arthur J. Gallagher, Atlanta
Education

John Byers, 35
Aon, Franklin, Tenn.
Employee Benefits

 

Karen Cangemi, 36
Aon, San Francisco
Technology

 

Louis Cipollo, 37
Aon, Philadelphia
Environmental

 

Seth Cohen, 33
HUB, Encino, Calif.
Entertainment

 

Brandon Cole, 32
Arthur J. Gallagher, Irvine, Calif.
Nonprofit

 

Edward Conlon, 38
Aon, New York
Financial Services

 

Logan Couch, 31
Aon, Houston
Energy, Traditional

 

Laura Decker, 27
Aon, New York
Environmental

Natalie Douglass, 38
Arthur J. Gallagher, St. Louis
At Large

 

Philip Dunn, 34
Aon, Philadelphia
Financial Services

 

Hardie Edgecombe, 33
Arthur J. Gallagher, Metiaire, La.
Marine

 

Jessica Fields, 34
Aon, San Francisco
Technology

 

Steve Fisk, 35
Barney & Barney, Aliso Viejo, Calif.
Retail

 

Amber Fixter, 35
Willis Towers Watson, New York
Environmental

 

Nicole Francis, 34
Marsh, Danville, Calif.
Health Care

 

David Fraser, 38
Aon, New York
At Large

 

John Galanis, 34
Aon/Albert G. Ruben, New York
Entertainment

 

Jeremy Gayser, 37
Aon, Houston
Energy, Traditional

George Gionis, 34
Aon, Philadelphia
Public Sector

Katherine Glancy Johnston, 33
Aon, Chicago
At Large

 

Mike Gong, 37
Arthur J. Gallagher, Fresno, Calif.
Real Estate

 

Chip Hardie, 30
Marsh, Philadelphia
Utilities

 

Jason Helfert, 37
Horton Group, Orland Park, Ill.
Nonprofit

 

Courtney Hensley, 38
Aon, Franklin, Tenn.
Education

 

Marcus Henthorn, 32
Arthur J. Gallagher, Itasca, Ill.
Public Sector

 

Blythe Hogan, 32
Aon, Atlanta
Fine Arts

 

Mira Jacinto, 31
Marsh, Los Angeles
Marine

 

Chris Kakel, 39
Woodruff-Sawyer & Co., Denver
Transportation

 

Nick Kalist, 39
Aon, St. Louis
Financial Services

Kate Kenny, 32
Marsh, Chicago
Education

 

Amy Klitzke, 34
Aon, Minneapolis
Pharmaceutical

 

Charles Krauth, 30
Aon, Atlanta
Health Care

 

Matt Kupiec, 30
Willis Towers Watson, New York
Financial Services

 

Tyler LaMantia, 30
Arthur J. Gallagher, Chicago
Education

 

Robert Logan, 34
Aon, Dallas
Energy, Renewable

 

Tony Lorber, 38
EPIC, San Francisco
Real Estate

 

Kimberly Mann, 28
Marsh, Philadelphia
Environmental

 

Kristina Marcigliano, 28
DeWitt Stern, New York
Fine Arts

 

Elizabeth Marshall, 28
Marsh, Chicago
Education

Cara McGrath, 31
Alliant, Boston
Energy, Traditional

 

Michael Menerey, 38
Alliant, Los Angeles
Employee Benefits

 

Duncan Milne, 34
Aon, New York
Public Sector

 

Alex Muralles, 36
Willis Towers Watson, Chicago
Financial Services

 

Christina Murphy, 31
Marsh, Houston
Energy, Traditional

 

Kelly Nash, 37
Marsh, Chicago
Private Client

 

Lee Newmark, 29
Arthur J. Gallagher, Itasca, Ill.
Health Care

 

Blake Parrish, 30
Marsh, Los Angeles
Energy, Renewable

 

Caroline Parrish, 39
Aon, Miami
Real Estate

 

Brian Pfund, 34
Marsh, Portland, Ore.
At Large

 

Andrew Racle, 33
Aon, San Francisco
At Large

 

Sanju Rajan, 31
Aon, Baltimore
Transportation

 

Nicholas Rawden, 31
Marsh, Rochester, N.Y.
Real Estate

 

Daniel R’bibo, 37
Arthur J. Gallagher, Glendale, Calif.
Entertainment

 

Brent Rieth, 31
Aon, San Francisco
Technology

 

Robert Rosenzweig, 31
Risk Strategies, New York
Technology

 

Galo Santana, 35
Aon, New York
Technology

 

John Selgrath, 36
Integro, San Francisco
Health Care

Ryan Shinkle, 33
Arthur J. Gallagher, Lafayette, La.
Construction

 

Kate Simons, 31
Aon, Chicago
Retail

 

Josh Thompson, 36
Aon, Little Rock, Ark.
Transportation

 

Emily Weiss, 30
DeWitt Stern, New York
Fine Arts

 

Jeremiah White, 39
Aon, Frederick, Md.
Transportation

 

Casey Wigglesworth, 38
Aon, Washington, D.C.
Fine Arts

 

Susan Young, 31
Marsh, Seattle
Retail

 

Eric Ziff, 32
Aon, New York
At Large

 

Fred Zutel, 30
Willis Towers Watson, Miami
Real Estate

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

2017 RIMS

Cyber Threat Will Get More Difficult

Companies should focus on response, resiliency and recovery when it comes to cyber risks.
By: | April 19, 2017 • 2 min read
Topics: Cyber Risks | RIMS

“The sky is not falling” when it comes to cyber security, but the threat is a growing challenge for companies.

“I am not a cyber apocalyptic kind of guy,” said Gen. Michael Hayden, former head of the Central Intelligence Agency and National Security Agency, who currently is a principal at the Chertoff Group, a security consultancy.

Gen. Michael Hayden, former head of the CIA and NSA, and principal, The Chertoff Group

“There are lots of things to worry about in the cyber domain and you don’t have to be apocalyptic to be concerned,” said Hayden prior to his presentation at a Global Risk Forum sponsored by Lockton on Sunday afternoon on the geopolitical threats facing the United States.

“We have only begun to consider the threat as it currently exists in the cyber domain.”

Hayden said cyber risk is equal to the threat times your vulnerability to the threat, times the consequences of a successful attack.

At present, companies are focusing on the vulnerability aspect, and responding by building “high walls and deep moats” to keep attackers out, he said. If you do that successfully, it will prevent 80 percent of the attackers.

“It’s all about making yourself a tougher target than the next like target,” he said.

But that still leaves 20 percent vulnerability, so companies need to focus on the consequences: It’s about response, resiliency and recovery, he said.

The range of attackers is vast, including nations that have used cyber attacks to disrupt Sony (the North Koreans angry about a movie), the Sands Casino (Iranians angry about the owner’s comments about their country), and U.S. banks (Iranians seeking to disrupt iconic U.S. institutions after the Stuxnet attack on their nuclear program), he said.

“You don’t have to offend anybody to be a target,” he said. “It may be enough to be iconic.”

The world order that has existed for the past 75 years “is melting away” and the world is less stable.

And no matter how much private companies do, it may not be enough.

“The big questions in cyber now are law and policy,” Hayden said. “We have not yet decided as a people what we want or will allow our government to do to keep us safe in the cyber domain.”

The U.S. government defends the country’s land, sea and air, but when it comes to cyber, defenses have been mostly left to private enterprises, he said.

“I don’t know that we have quite decided the balance between the government’s role and the private sector’s role,” he said.

As for the government’s role in the geopolitical challenges facing it, Hayden said he has seen times that were more dangerous, but never more complicated.

The world order that has existed for the past 75 years “is melting away” and the world is less stable, he said.

Nations such as North Korea, Iran, Russia and Pakistan are “ambitious, brittle and nuclear.” The Islamic world is in a clash between secular and religious governance, and China, which he said is “competitive and occasionally confrontational” is facing its own demographic and economic challenges.

“It’s going to be a tough century,” Hayden said.

Anne Freedman is managing editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]